Issues

Journal & Issues

AHEAD OF PRINT

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 2 (April 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 5 (October 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 4 (August 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 3 (June 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 2 (April 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 1 (February 2010)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 5-6 (September 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 4 (July 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 3 (May 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 2 (March 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 1 (January 2009)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 6 (November 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 5 (September 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 4 (July 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 3 (May 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 2 (March 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 1 (January 2008)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 6 (November 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 5 (September 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 4 (July 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 3 (May 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 2 (March 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 1 (January 2007)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 6 (November 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 5 (September 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 4 (July 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 3 (May 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 2 (March 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 1 (January 2006)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 6 (November 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 5 (September 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 4 (July 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 3 (May 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 2 (March 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 1 (January 2005)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 4-5 (September 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 2 (March 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 1 (January 2004)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 5-6 (September 2009)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

9 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

20 Jahre Mauerfall – es bleibt noch viel zu tun

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 1 - 2

Abstract

Wissenschaftliche Beiträge

access type Open Access

Industrial Clusters as Source of regional Prosperity?

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 341 - 352

Abstract

Abstract

This paper explores the impact of industrial clusters on regional growth at level of Germany’s functionally defined labour market regions (AMAMR) within a regional convergence model. It focuses especially on the role of the co-location of vertically connected industrial sectors. Based on works of Schnabl (2000) it is possible to identify three different effects of industrial clusters on regional economic performance. Beside the effect of regionally concentrated economic sectors (horizontal clusters) and value adding chains (vertical clusters) on the region itself, we are able to control for regional spillover effects of industrial clusters. Further, the study allows the isolated examination of the impact of industrial cluster while taking regional convergence into consideration.

It is possible to demonstrate positive growth effects of industrial clusters along with an overall process of convergence as same as with a specific eastern one. Therefore industrial cluster present an opportunity to explain deficits within the process of East-West-Convergence. Their relative absence of industrial clusters in Eastern Germany influences the growth potential in a negative way.

Keywords

  • Regional Convergence
  • Industrial Cluster

Schlagwörter

  • Regionale Konvergenz
  • Industrielle Cluster
access type Open Access

Die Identifikation horizontaler und vertikaler industrieller Clusterstrukturen in Deutschland

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 353 - 368

Abstract

Abstract

If regional development agencies assume the cluster concept to be an adequate framework to promote regional growth and competitiveness, it is necessary to identify industrial clusters in a comprehensive manner. Previous studies used a diversity of methods starting with specific regional case studies, input-output methods and different concentration measures. This article presents a new instrument in empirical cluster research-the Qualitative Input-Output Analysis-, which offers the possibility to identify industrial cluster in conjunction with concentration measures. Especially, this method allows the combination of an identified critical mass of regional firms with the necessity of interaction of these firms within an input-output framework. Applying this method to Germany’s “Arbeitsmarktregionen” we find that 103 “Arbeitsmarkregionen” show first signs of horizontal industrial clusters, white only 28 regions are able to attract vertical industrial clusters. 139 “Arbeitsmarktregionen” did not show signs of industrial clusters according to the research design.

Keywords

  • Industrial Cluster
  • Qualitative Input-Output-Analysis
  • Regional Economic Development

Schlagwörter

  • Industrielle Cluster
  • Qualitative Input-Output Analyse
  • Regionale Entwicklung

JEL classification

  • R12
  • R1S
  • L60
access type Open Access

Reconfiguration of Space in the Knowledge Society

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 369 - 382

Abstract

Abstract

Since long knowledge has been a motor for the society’s development. The way knowledge is produced, distributed, and applied, has changed considerably and leads to regional differences. In this article the spatial implications of this development are theoretically, statistically, and empirically elaborated. The spatial dimension of the knowledge society becomes apparent by the identification of, firstly, types of spaces and locations and, secondly, the resulting spatial patterns. Finally, the consequences for development strategies are discussed, namely in relation to knowledge society’s location factors and the pooling of knowledge networks in knowledge regions.

Keywords

  • knowledge society
  • spatial development
  • disparities
  • locational factor
  • knowledge region

Schlagwörter

  • Wissensgesellschaft
  • Raumentwicklung
  • Disparitäten
  • Standortpotential
  • Wissensregion
access type Open Access

Knowledge-holders and networking in metropolitan regions. Spatial requirements of knowledge-holders and the combination of politics

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 383 - 394

Abstract

Abstract

In politics and planning, a discussion of knowledge-holders is characterized through reductions, e.g. by focusing on creative people and their affinity for an urban environment. This article evaluates the strategies of metropolitan areas to show what kinds of problems exist within the transfer of information about knowledge-holders into planning strategies. Furthermore, different perspectives are elaborated that show heterogeneous requirements from the private and professional lives of knowledge-holders. These cause different spatial requirements and therefore form the basis for a differentiated development of spatial strategies.

Keywords

  • metropolitan regions
  • human capital
  • strategy development
  • migration
  • spatial requirements

Schlagwörter

  • Metropolregionen
  • Humankapital
  • Strategieentwicklung
  • Zuwanderung
  • Raumansprüche
access type Open Access

Main features of a constructivist landscape theory and its consequences for spatial planning

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 395 - 404

Abstract

Abstract

The paper is based on the social constructivist landscape theory. In this setting, landscape is not constituted as a physical object but as a social construct that uses physical objects. Consequently, landscape can be described as a hybrid based on individual and social conceptions which includes also physical objects. Another dimension of the hybrid is the fact that landscape has cultural references as well as natural ones. Concerning the practice with landscape in the spatial planning these remarks imply that landscape could not reduced to its physical objects. It rather should be thought also as a social and individual construct. In this context has to be considered that landscape is barely able to be planned because it is usually an unintended side-effect of social development. Furthermore the integration of the needs of minors in power concerning the practice with landscape is demanded.

Keywords

  • Landscape theory
  • landscape
  • constructivism
  • spatial planning
  • hybrid
  • cultural landscape

Schlagwörter

  • Landschaftstheorie
  • Landschaft
  • Konstruktivismus
  • Raumplanung
  • Hybrid
  • Kulturlandschaft

Berichte aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Privatisation of German Rail

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 405 - 411

Abstract

Abstract

The railway is a key part of the services of general interest and fulfils important functions for the common welfare. But against the background of the states’ limited financial resources the rail also has to work cost-effectively. This polarity can be solved in the best way by a transition from the “accountability for services” to the “accountability for regulation” of the state. This means that the provision of transport services is put out to tender under predefined conditions and for a limited period of time. Prom a spatial planning perspective the rail network has to set up high-capacity links between economic centres as well as connections to peripheral spaces.

Keywords

  • infrastructure
  • transport
  • railway
  • services of general interest
  • privatisation
  • regulation

Schlagwörter

  • Infrastruktur
  • Verkehr
  • Eisenbahn
  • Daseinsvorsorge
  • Privatisierung
  • Regulierung

Rezensionen, neue Literatur

access type Open Access

Rezensionen

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 412 - 420

Abstract

access type Open Access

Buchanzeigen

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 421 - 421

Abstract

9 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

20 Jahre Mauerfall – es bleibt noch viel zu tun

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 1 - 2

Abstract

Wissenschaftliche Beiträge

access type Open Access

Industrial Clusters as Source of regional Prosperity?

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 341 - 352

Abstract

Abstract

This paper explores the impact of industrial clusters on regional growth at level of Germany’s functionally defined labour market regions (AMAMR) within a regional convergence model. It focuses especially on the role of the co-location of vertically connected industrial sectors. Based on works of Schnabl (2000) it is possible to identify three different effects of industrial clusters on regional economic performance. Beside the effect of regionally concentrated economic sectors (horizontal clusters) and value adding chains (vertical clusters) on the region itself, we are able to control for regional spillover effects of industrial clusters. Further, the study allows the isolated examination of the impact of industrial cluster while taking regional convergence into consideration.

It is possible to demonstrate positive growth effects of industrial clusters along with an overall process of convergence as same as with a specific eastern one. Therefore industrial cluster present an opportunity to explain deficits within the process of East-West-Convergence. Their relative absence of industrial clusters in Eastern Germany influences the growth potential in a negative way.

Keywords

  • Regional Convergence
  • Industrial Cluster

Schlagwörter

  • Regionale Konvergenz
  • Industrielle Cluster
access type Open Access

Die Identifikation horizontaler und vertikaler industrieller Clusterstrukturen in Deutschland

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 353 - 368

Abstract

Abstract

If regional development agencies assume the cluster concept to be an adequate framework to promote regional growth and competitiveness, it is necessary to identify industrial clusters in a comprehensive manner. Previous studies used a diversity of methods starting with specific regional case studies, input-output methods and different concentration measures. This article presents a new instrument in empirical cluster research-the Qualitative Input-Output Analysis-, which offers the possibility to identify industrial cluster in conjunction with concentration measures. Especially, this method allows the combination of an identified critical mass of regional firms with the necessity of interaction of these firms within an input-output framework. Applying this method to Germany’s “Arbeitsmarktregionen” we find that 103 “Arbeitsmarkregionen” show first signs of horizontal industrial clusters, white only 28 regions are able to attract vertical industrial clusters. 139 “Arbeitsmarktregionen” did not show signs of industrial clusters according to the research design.

Keywords

  • Industrial Cluster
  • Qualitative Input-Output-Analysis
  • Regional Economic Development

Schlagwörter

  • Industrielle Cluster
  • Qualitative Input-Output Analyse
  • Regionale Entwicklung

JEL classification

  • R12
  • R1S
  • L60
access type Open Access

Reconfiguration of Space in the Knowledge Society

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 369 - 382

Abstract

Abstract

Since long knowledge has been a motor for the society’s development. The way knowledge is produced, distributed, and applied, has changed considerably and leads to regional differences. In this article the spatial implications of this development are theoretically, statistically, and empirically elaborated. The spatial dimension of the knowledge society becomes apparent by the identification of, firstly, types of spaces and locations and, secondly, the resulting spatial patterns. Finally, the consequences for development strategies are discussed, namely in relation to knowledge society’s location factors and the pooling of knowledge networks in knowledge regions.

Keywords

  • knowledge society
  • spatial development
  • disparities
  • locational factor
  • knowledge region

Schlagwörter

  • Wissensgesellschaft
  • Raumentwicklung
  • Disparitäten
  • Standortpotential
  • Wissensregion
access type Open Access

Knowledge-holders and networking in metropolitan regions. Spatial requirements of knowledge-holders and the combination of politics

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 383 - 394

Abstract

Abstract

In politics and planning, a discussion of knowledge-holders is characterized through reductions, e.g. by focusing on creative people and their affinity for an urban environment. This article evaluates the strategies of metropolitan areas to show what kinds of problems exist within the transfer of information about knowledge-holders into planning strategies. Furthermore, different perspectives are elaborated that show heterogeneous requirements from the private and professional lives of knowledge-holders. These cause different spatial requirements and therefore form the basis for a differentiated development of spatial strategies.

Keywords

  • metropolitan regions
  • human capital
  • strategy development
  • migration
  • spatial requirements

Schlagwörter

  • Metropolregionen
  • Humankapital
  • Strategieentwicklung
  • Zuwanderung
  • Raumansprüche
access type Open Access

Main features of a constructivist landscape theory and its consequences for spatial planning

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 395 - 404

Abstract

Abstract

The paper is based on the social constructivist landscape theory. In this setting, landscape is not constituted as a physical object but as a social construct that uses physical objects. Consequently, landscape can be described as a hybrid based on individual and social conceptions which includes also physical objects. Another dimension of the hybrid is the fact that landscape has cultural references as well as natural ones. Concerning the practice with landscape in the spatial planning these remarks imply that landscape could not reduced to its physical objects. It rather should be thought also as a social and individual construct. In this context has to be considered that landscape is barely able to be planned because it is usually an unintended side-effect of social development. Furthermore the integration of the needs of minors in power concerning the practice with landscape is demanded.

Keywords

  • Landscape theory
  • landscape
  • constructivism
  • spatial planning
  • hybrid
  • cultural landscape

Schlagwörter

  • Landschaftstheorie
  • Landschaft
  • Konstruktivismus
  • Raumplanung
  • Hybrid
  • Kulturlandschaft

Berichte aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Privatisation of German Rail

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 405 - 411

Abstract

Abstract

The railway is a key part of the services of general interest and fulfils important functions for the common welfare. But against the background of the states’ limited financial resources the rail also has to work cost-effectively. This polarity can be solved in the best way by a transition from the “accountability for services” to the “accountability for regulation” of the state. This means that the provision of transport services is put out to tender under predefined conditions and for a limited period of time. Prom a spatial planning perspective the rail network has to set up high-capacity links between economic centres as well as connections to peripheral spaces.

Keywords

  • infrastructure
  • transport
  • railway
  • services of general interest
  • privatisation
  • regulation

Schlagwörter

  • Infrastruktur
  • Verkehr
  • Eisenbahn
  • Daseinsvorsorge
  • Privatisierung
  • Regulierung

Rezensionen, neue Literatur

access type Open Access

Rezensionen

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 412 - 420

Abstract

access type Open Access

Buchanzeigen

Published Online: 31 Dec 2009
Page range: 421 - 421

Abstract

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo