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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 6 (November 2008)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Zukunftsfähigkeit der Raumplanung?

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 1 - 1

Abstract

Wissenschaftliche Beiträge

access type Open Access

The role of spatial planning in society

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 475 - 485

Abstract

Abstract

Spatial planning is a public task which is concerned with identifying, explaining and solving difficult problems with spatial impacts. A large part of its remit is therefore to provide technical advice to policymakers and to inform the general public. Spatial planning has successfully established itself as a distinct discipline – and one which is naw quite indispensible, not least due to the absence of any real alternative to it. For what other discipline is there which takes on responsibility for sustainable spatial development by embracing not only the social, ecological and economic, but also the cultural and political dimensions; or expands the prospects for regions, cities, neighbourhoods and villages by promoting integration and interdisciplinary approaches; or, in the face of all uncertainty, which plots possible long-term courses of development for society to follow? In times of increasing segmentation, it is precisely the multifaceted nature of spatial planning that makes it not only both distinct and modern, but also a neutral source of authority. Nonetheless, the point at which spatial planning has traditionally brought – and continues to bring – its influence to bear is not at the very heart of political activity or at the centre of the debates taking place within society, but rather in the background. Only in rare cases are individual citizens directly affected by the decisions taken in the field of spatial planning. With some regularity, spatial planning is called upon to list its successes and to justify its existence, not least because the standing it enjoys within society is not particularly high. However, spatial planning must itself bear some responsibility for the relatively poor image it has acquired and for its lack of visibility. Apart from in a small number of exceptional cases, it remains much too reticent in contexts where it should rather market its distinctiveness, its strengths and its competencies – qualities which are described, albeit briefly, in the present paper. This would seem to be an auspicious time for a concerted marketing campaign. The new guidelines for spatial development in Germany call for a refocusing of tasks and for a new understanding of the role of spatial planning. With their new bachelor’s and master’s degrees, university courses in spatial planning are now positioning themselves for the future.

Keywords

  • spatial research
  • spatial planning
  • sectoral plans with spatial impacts
  • sustainable spatial development
  • parity of living standards
  • demographic change
  • adaptation to climate change
access type Open Access

Spatial planning in the future

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 486 - 497

Abstract

Abstract

In a world of change, regional planning in Germany has permanently to deal with new demands and challenges. Against this background, the article analyses the tasks of spatial planning, regarding their future significance for planning practice. As shown, „products“ and key issues of planning remain of great importance while there is a need for customised strategies for different types of regions. Furthermore, requirements for planners are given to increase the political and public perception of spatial planning.

Keywords

  • regional planning
  • spatial planning
  • future
  • types of regions
  • strategic planning
access type Open Access

The Bologna approval and potential consequences for planning education in Germany

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 498 - 507

Abstract

Abstract

The decision of the European Union, to harmonize higher education in Europe and to do this on the basis of the Anglo-American system of BA/MA structures (the so-called Bologna process) has caused considerable turmoil at German universities. This has been particularly a concern of Technical Universities which were forced to abandon a long tradition of engineering degrees. With the reform, full time (five years) planning education in Germany, exclusively established at Technical Universities is under scrutiny. By now all German schools of planning have restructured their programmes and introduced BA/BSc and MAI MSc degrees, substituting the traditional Dipl. Ing. in planning. This transformation will have considerable repercussions on the established programmes, on teaching and on practice orientation, as well as on student admission and international mobility. The article raises the respective issues for the programmes and discusses the likely implications for planning schools.

Keywords

  • Bologna agreement
  • planning education
  • BA/MA courses
  • higher education and planning courses in Germany
access type Open Access

Planning education in Europe – situation and perspectives

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 508 - 518

Abstract

Abstract

This paper examines the education of spatial planners in Europe. The comparison is based on studies about the current state of implementation of the Bologna Process, which has been originally undertaken and recently updated by the Association of European Schools of Planning (AESOP). The training of planners, i.e. the quality of planning education and its applied standards, is a key point of discussion among schools of planning. Ultimately, the definition of standards depends on the feedback from professional circles (in particular regarding the situation on the labour market), and on co-operation with planning organisations. Accordingly, AESOP currently is in discussion with the European Council of Spatial Planners (ECTP) on the extent to which standards should be defined in terms of the new system of university degrees (bachelor’s and master’s degrees) to guarantee a common European labour market and avoid any restrictions on access.

Keywords

  • Bologna Process
  • planning education
  • degree standards
  • spatial planning
  • urban and regional

Berichte aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Perspectives and Changes in planning education: The case study Technische Universität Dortmund, School of Spatial Planning

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 519 - 532

Abstract

Abstract

This article deals with the adaptation of study courses to the two-cycle bachelor‘s and master‘s study system in planning education, according to the Bologna process. At first crucial general conditions coming along with the Bologna Reform are introduced. This contains among others the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) and new requirements concerning the structure and duration of academic programmes. Further basic considerations on planning education are presented. The main focus of the article is on the case study about the courses of planning studies belonging to the Technische Universität Dortmund, School of Spatial Planning.

Keywords

  • Planning education
  • Bologna Process
  • Bachelor
  • Master
access type Open Access

Selected structural information on spatial planning studies at German universities

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 533 - 539

Abstract

Abstract

The Bologna Process aims to create an European Higher Education Area by 2010. At the moment, study courses in the field of spatial planning are also getting reorganized. This article describes consecutive bachelor and master study courses in spatial planning by means of a variety of attributes, for example the maximal number of credit points and the duration of the study course. The following universities are included in the synoptical comparison: Berlin, Cottbus, Dortmund, Hamburg-Harburg, Kaiserslautern, Kassel und Nürtingen-Geislingen.

Keywords

  • spatial planning
  • bachelor
  • master
  • studies
  • Bologna process
access type Open Access

Considering aspects of gender within the new tiered degree programs in spatial planning

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 540 - 546

Abstract

Abstract

The article analyses in how far the new tiered degree programmes of spatial planning, which have been developed within the so-called „Bologna Process“, are containing any gender contents or modules. This examination includes the German universities of Cottbus, Hamburg, Berlin, Dortmund and Kaiserslautern.

The author points out that gender traditions are proceeded where they already have been existent. However, if those traditions have not been existent before, universities did not establish any gender aspects in the course of the reforms. Finally, it is suggested that sustainable spatial development has to be supported by gender aspects. Therefore, universities are advised to further develop those aspects within their study programme.

Keywords

  • gender equality
  • gender mainstreaming
  • accreditation
  • degree programs of spatial planning in Germany
  • requirement of innovation in (higher) education

Article

access type Open Access

Rezension in der Form eines Essays des Buches von

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 547 - 566

Abstract

access type Open Access

Buchanzeigen

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 567 - 567

Abstract

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Zukunftsfähigkeit der Raumplanung?

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 1 - 1

Abstract

Wissenschaftliche Beiträge

access type Open Access

The role of spatial planning in society

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 475 - 485

Abstract

Abstract

Spatial planning is a public task which is concerned with identifying, explaining and solving difficult problems with spatial impacts. A large part of its remit is therefore to provide technical advice to policymakers and to inform the general public. Spatial planning has successfully established itself as a distinct discipline – and one which is naw quite indispensible, not least due to the absence of any real alternative to it. For what other discipline is there which takes on responsibility for sustainable spatial development by embracing not only the social, ecological and economic, but also the cultural and political dimensions; or expands the prospects for regions, cities, neighbourhoods and villages by promoting integration and interdisciplinary approaches; or, in the face of all uncertainty, which plots possible long-term courses of development for society to follow? In times of increasing segmentation, it is precisely the multifaceted nature of spatial planning that makes it not only both distinct and modern, but also a neutral source of authority. Nonetheless, the point at which spatial planning has traditionally brought – and continues to bring – its influence to bear is not at the very heart of political activity or at the centre of the debates taking place within society, but rather in the background. Only in rare cases are individual citizens directly affected by the decisions taken in the field of spatial planning. With some regularity, spatial planning is called upon to list its successes and to justify its existence, not least because the standing it enjoys within society is not particularly high. However, spatial planning must itself bear some responsibility for the relatively poor image it has acquired and for its lack of visibility. Apart from in a small number of exceptional cases, it remains much too reticent in contexts where it should rather market its distinctiveness, its strengths and its competencies – qualities which are described, albeit briefly, in the present paper. This would seem to be an auspicious time for a concerted marketing campaign. The new guidelines for spatial development in Germany call for a refocusing of tasks and for a new understanding of the role of spatial planning. With their new bachelor’s and master’s degrees, university courses in spatial planning are now positioning themselves for the future.

Keywords

  • spatial research
  • spatial planning
  • sectoral plans with spatial impacts
  • sustainable spatial development
  • parity of living standards
  • demographic change
  • adaptation to climate change
access type Open Access

Spatial planning in the future

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 486 - 497

Abstract

Abstract

In a world of change, regional planning in Germany has permanently to deal with new demands and challenges. Against this background, the article analyses the tasks of spatial planning, regarding their future significance for planning practice. As shown, „products“ and key issues of planning remain of great importance while there is a need for customised strategies for different types of regions. Furthermore, requirements for planners are given to increase the political and public perception of spatial planning.

Keywords

  • regional planning
  • spatial planning
  • future
  • types of regions
  • strategic planning
access type Open Access

The Bologna approval and potential consequences for planning education in Germany

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 498 - 507

Abstract

Abstract

The decision of the European Union, to harmonize higher education in Europe and to do this on the basis of the Anglo-American system of BA/MA structures (the so-called Bologna process) has caused considerable turmoil at German universities. This has been particularly a concern of Technical Universities which were forced to abandon a long tradition of engineering degrees. With the reform, full time (five years) planning education in Germany, exclusively established at Technical Universities is under scrutiny. By now all German schools of planning have restructured their programmes and introduced BA/BSc and MAI MSc degrees, substituting the traditional Dipl. Ing. in planning. This transformation will have considerable repercussions on the established programmes, on teaching and on practice orientation, as well as on student admission and international mobility. The article raises the respective issues for the programmes and discusses the likely implications for planning schools.

Keywords

  • Bologna agreement
  • planning education
  • BA/MA courses
  • higher education and planning courses in Germany
access type Open Access

Planning education in Europe – situation and perspectives

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 508 - 518

Abstract

Abstract

This paper examines the education of spatial planners in Europe. The comparison is based on studies about the current state of implementation of the Bologna Process, which has been originally undertaken and recently updated by the Association of European Schools of Planning (AESOP). The training of planners, i.e. the quality of planning education and its applied standards, is a key point of discussion among schools of planning. Ultimately, the definition of standards depends on the feedback from professional circles (in particular regarding the situation on the labour market), and on co-operation with planning organisations. Accordingly, AESOP currently is in discussion with the European Council of Spatial Planners (ECTP) on the extent to which standards should be defined in terms of the new system of university degrees (bachelor’s and master’s degrees) to guarantee a common European labour market and avoid any restrictions on access.

Keywords

  • Bologna Process
  • planning education
  • degree standards
  • spatial planning
  • urban and regional

Berichte aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Perspectives and Changes in planning education: The case study Technische Universität Dortmund, School of Spatial Planning

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 519 - 532

Abstract

Abstract

This article deals with the adaptation of study courses to the two-cycle bachelor‘s and master‘s study system in planning education, according to the Bologna process. At first crucial general conditions coming along with the Bologna Reform are introduced. This contains among others the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) and new requirements concerning the structure and duration of academic programmes. Further basic considerations on planning education are presented. The main focus of the article is on the case study about the courses of planning studies belonging to the Technische Universität Dortmund, School of Spatial Planning.

Keywords

  • Planning education
  • Bologna Process
  • Bachelor
  • Master
access type Open Access

Selected structural information on spatial planning studies at German universities

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 533 - 539

Abstract

Abstract

The Bologna Process aims to create an European Higher Education Area by 2010. At the moment, study courses in the field of spatial planning are also getting reorganized. This article describes consecutive bachelor and master study courses in spatial planning by means of a variety of attributes, for example the maximal number of credit points and the duration of the study course. The following universities are included in the synoptical comparison: Berlin, Cottbus, Dortmund, Hamburg-Harburg, Kaiserslautern, Kassel und Nürtingen-Geislingen.

Keywords

  • spatial planning
  • bachelor
  • master
  • studies
  • Bologna process
access type Open Access

Considering aspects of gender within the new tiered degree programs in spatial planning

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 540 - 546

Abstract

Abstract

The article analyses in how far the new tiered degree programmes of spatial planning, which have been developed within the so-called „Bologna Process“, are containing any gender contents or modules. This examination includes the German universities of Cottbus, Hamburg, Berlin, Dortmund and Kaiserslautern.

The author points out that gender traditions are proceeded where they already have been existent. However, if those traditions have not been existent before, universities did not establish any gender aspects in the course of the reforms. Finally, it is suggested that sustainable spatial development has to be supported by gender aspects. Therefore, universities are advised to further develop those aspects within their study programme.

Keywords

  • gender equality
  • gender mainstreaming
  • accreditation
  • degree programs of spatial planning in Germany
  • requirement of innovation in (higher) education

Article

access type Open Access

Rezension in der Form eines Essays des Buches von

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 547 - 566

Abstract

access type Open Access

Buchanzeigen

Published Online: 31 Dec 2008
Page range: 567 - 567

Abstract

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