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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 2 (March 2008)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

11 Articles

Wissenschaftliche Beiträge

Open Access

Introduction. Cities and urban policy

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 101 - 106

Abstract

Abstract

Issue 4/2007 of this journal was dedicated to EU structural policy and the European structural funds, including the impacts of distribution. This current issue addresses European cities as compact spheres of economic activity, and their strategic importance for the implementation of a European policy of accelerated growth, also with a critical view on a mere aiming for the goals of the Lisbon Strategy. This involves analysis and discussion of various current approaches at national level and of the development trends of integration-based urban policy in the field of tension between the Lisbon Strategy and territorial cohesion. In addition to historical developments and local strategies, focus is also placed on the analysis and (further) development of models of urban governance with their idealised notion of a local community of responsibility; European reality does, however, to a greater of lesser extent diverge from this ideal.

Keywords

  • Urban Development Policy
  • Europe
  • Lisbon Strategy
  • Territorial Cohesion
  • Governance
Open Access

Urban development through the EU: European urban policy and URBAN-approach in the area of conflict of the Lisbon Strategy and the Leipzig Charter

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 107 - 117

Abstract

Abstract

This paper discusses recent developments and the current state of EU urban policy against the backdrop of the Lisbon strategy and the Leipzig Charter, drawing for purposes of illustration on the URBAN initiative to revitalise disadvantaged urban areas. In contrast to the Lisbon process, which shifted the focus unmistakably to „strengthening competitiveness“, the Leipzig Charter – hatched during Germany’s presidency of the EU – stresses the need to promote socially integrative urban development. Notwithstanding this conflict, the author argues that the real key to understanding European urban policy is „governance“, i. e. changes in forms of municipal steering and control.

Keywords

  • European Urban Policy
  • Lisbon Strategy
  • Leipzig Charter
  • Competitiveness
  • Cohesion
  • Governance
Open Access

Options and constraints for a national urban policy – a political science perspective

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 118 - 129

Abstract

Abstract

The article deals with the leeway of integrated national urban policies. The competencies and options of the German federal government concerning the city regions are put in comparative perspective. Experiences with programmes of national urban policies are resumed for identifying pivotal problems. Restricted competencies and a lack of coordination in federal government cause a sceptical view on the possibility of an integrated approach of urban policy “from above” Without neglecting the innovative character of federal pilot projects, a strengthening of local competencies and their room for manoeuvre is identified as a more important policy approach.

Keywords

  • National Urban Policy
  • Cohesion
  • Federalism
  • Local self-administration
  • Governance
Open Access

National urban development policy in Germany – between trial and vision

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 130 - 138

Abstract

Abstract

On 2nd in July 2007 Federal Minister for Urban Affairs, Wolfgang Tiefensee, invited the public to take part in a public dialog on new accents for urban development in Germany by announcing the policy initiative “Towards a national Urban Development Policy in Germany”. The initiative is supported by the Federal State, the Länder and the cities. Main intention of the initiative is to enhance a public discourse on urban development in Germany as well as to create innovations to ensure the social relevance and the productivity of cities in an environment of rapid economical and societal change. The article describes the basic conditions for urban development which have changed in the past years and concludes with regard to the European Level that a national urban development policy is required in Germany.

Keywords

  • National Urban Development Policy
  • Leipzig Charter
  • Innovation
  • Public Discourse
Open Access

Spatial development is urban development is spatial development

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 139 - 151

Abstract

Abstract

The empirical fact that in Germany around three-thirds of the population live in large city regions, although the society has a mainly urban character, and the predominant understanding of spatial development (policy) do not match. Rather seem certain tenors, which are based on the antinomy of city and countryside, to have an effect. Nowadays, urban and spatial development should not be analytically separated and put in contrast to each other but understood as a whole. The interdependencies between old and new forms of urbanity have to be considered. The article argues for this change of perspective. At the same time it is supposed to highlight the necessity of political and planning-related action in city-regional contexts and the connection between urban and spatial development policies.

Keywords

  • Urban Development
  • Spatial Development Policy
  • Equivalence of Living Conditions
  • Urban-Rural-Contrast
  • Metropolitan Area
Open Access

Urban policy for large cities in England – the example of Manchester

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 152 - 167

Abstract

Abstract

When elected in 1997, the British Labour Government made urban policy one of its key policy concerns. Criticism of the shortcomings of previous, predominantly market oriented urban policy, was combined with new approaches to state action. Numerous programmes were developed, new institutions created and urban policy initiatives were launched which are still reflected in both national and municipal urban policy in England. The urban policy of the Blair government has received an overall favourable assessment in recent evaluative reports. Such studies conclude that in the towns and cities social cohesion has grown over the last ten years, they have become mare competitive and the quality of life, which in England is commonly defined in relation to the quality of public space, has risen. This article outlines the main features of this urban policy over the last ten years. It takes the example of Manchester’s urban policy, widely regarded as a particularly successful and notable case, to demonstrate policy outcomes.

Keywords

  • England
  • National Urban Policy
  • Labour-Government
  • Urban Regeneration
  • Manchester
Open Access

A few factors in understanding French town planning

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 168 - 177

Abstract

Abstract

Current affairs have lately shone a less-than-flattering light on various events associated with French planning, but without giving much illumination to the reasons behind them. It is difficult to decode the deep-rooted causes of these phenomena without knowing about the historical, political and administrative context of French planning. We also need to understand the new political issues that are arising and the economic levers acting on a European scale, such as the emergence of new global private operators interacting with local contacts in terms of fundraising, management and urban design.

Keywords

  • France
  • Urban Planning
  • History of Urban Development
  • National Urban Policy
Open Access

Challenges to national urban policies in the Netherlands

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 178 - 190

Abstract

Abstract

Recently, a new consensus about the role of cities as the motors of the regional, national and European economy has emerged. However, there is also substantial evidence that social problems are growing in many cities. Linking economic competitiveness to increasing social inclusion is a crucial challenge for policy-makers at all levels of government. The article intends to shed light on the way the Dutch central government tries to support cities to develop into sustainable, vital, complete and competitive entities. As response to a powerful plea by the largest cities themselves, an integrated policy (linking spatial, economic, social, environmental and safety policies) explicitly focused on cities, was given shape. Prime issues are covenants between central government and each city, based on tailor-made long-term strategies, including measurable objectives. To get a clear picture of the policy’s effectiveness – after 13 years of experience – appears to be difficult. Reviewers argue that a lot of aspects could be improved. For the current phase most of these comments have been taken into account.

Keywords

  • The Netherlands
  • National Urban Policy
  • Integrated Urban Development
  • Lisbon Agenda
Open Access

Urban development problems of the new Central European EU member states

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 191 - 204

Abstract

Abstract

The transition from socialist to market-oriented economies after 1990 brought about farranging changes in Central European cities with locally and regionally selective effects. The capital areas that profited a lot from those trends were only partly successful in strategically influencing spatial development. Therefore the remarkable upgrading of inner cities was accompanied by unintended effects somewhat similar to known development patterns in the West such as suburban sprawl. After the enlargement of the EU in 2004 and with the upcoming socio-spatial polarisation there is an increasing need for state-funded regeneration strategies that should contribute to overcoming the lack of integrated urban policies prevailing in many of the accession states.

Keywords

  • Urban Development
  • Central Europe
  • Economic and Political Transformation
  • National Urban Policy
  • Housing Policy
  • Urban Regeneration

Rezensionen, neue Literatur

Article

Open Access

Buchanzeigen

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 214 - 214

Abstract

11 Articles

Wissenschaftliche Beiträge

Open Access

Introduction. Cities and urban policy

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 101 - 106

Abstract

Abstract

Issue 4/2007 of this journal was dedicated to EU structural policy and the European structural funds, including the impacts of distribution. This current issue addresses European cities as compact spheres of economic activity, and their strategic importance for the implementation of a European policy of accelerated growth, also with a critical view on a mere aiming for the goals of the Lisbon Strategy. This involves analysis and discussion of various current approaches at national level and of the development trends of integration-based urban policy in the field of tension between the Lisbon Strategy and territorial cohesion. In addition to historical developments and local strategies, focus is also placed on the analysis and (further) development of models of urban governance with their idealised notion of a local community of responsibility; European reality does, however, to a greater of lesser extent diverge from this ideal.

Keywords

  • Urban Development Policy
  • Europe
  • Lisbon Strategy
  • Territorial Cohesion
  • Governance
Open Access

Urban development through the EU: European urban policy and URBAN-approach in the area of conflict of the Lisbon Strategy and the Leipzig Charter

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 107 - 117

Abstract

Abstract

This paper discusses recent developments and the current state of EU urban policy against the backdrop of the Lisbon strategy and the Leipzig Charter, drawing for purposes of illustration on the URBAN initiative to revitalise disadvantaged urban areas. In contrast to the Lisbon process, which shifted the focus unmistakably to „strengthening competitiveness“, the Leipzig Charter – hatched during Germany’s presidency of the EU – stresses the need to promote socially integrative urban development. Notwithstanding this conflict, the author argues that the real key to understanding European urban policy is „governance“, i. e. changes in forms of municipal steering and control.

Keywords

  • European Urban Policy
  • Lisbon Strategy
  • Leipzig Charter
  • Competitiveness
  • Cohesion
  • Governance
Open Access

Options and constraints for a national urban policy – a political science perspective

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 118 - 129

Abstract

Abstract

The article deals with the leeway of integrated national urban policies. The competencies and options of the German federal government concerning the city regions are put in comparative perspective. Experiences with programmes of national urban policies are resumed for identifying pivotal problems. Restricted competencies and a lack of coordination in federal government cause a sceptical view on the possibility of an integrated approach of urban policy “from above” Without neglecting the innovative character of federal pilot projects, a strengthening of local competencies and their room for manoeuvre is identified as a more important policy approach.

Keywords

  • National Urban Policy
  • Cohesion
  • Federalism
  • Local self-administration
  • Governance
Open Access

National urban development policy in Germany – between trial and vision

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 130 - 138

Abstract

Abstract

On 2nd in July 2007 Federal Minister for Urban Affairs, Wolfgang Tiefensee, invited the public to take part in a public dialog on new accents for urban development in Germany by announcing the policy initiative “Towards a national Urban Development Policy in Germany”. The initiative is supported by the Federal State, the Länder and the cities. Main intention of the initiative is to enhance a public discourse on urban development in Germany as well as to create innovations to ensure the social relevance and the productivity of cities in an environment of rapid economical and societal change. The article describes the basic conditions for urban development which have changed in the past years and concludes with regard to the European Level that a national urban development policy is required in Germany.

Keywords

  • National Urban Development Policy
  • Leipzig Charter
  • Innovation
  • Public Discourse
Open Access

Spatial development is urban development is spatial development

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 139 - 151

Abstract

Abstract

The empirical fact that in Germany around three-thirds of the population live in large city regions, although the society has a mainly urban character, and the predominant understanding of spatial development (policy) do not match. Rather seem certain tenors, which are based on the antinomy of city and countryside, to have an effect. Nowadays, urban and spatial development should not be analytically separated and put in contrast to each other but understood as a whole. The interdependencies between old and new forms of urbanity have to be considered. The article argues for this change of perspective. At the same time it is supposed to highlight the necessity of political and planning-related action in city-regional contexts and the connection between urban and spatial development policies.

Keywords

  • Urban Development
  • Spatial Development Policy
  • Equivalence of Living Conditions
  • Urban-Rural-Contrast
  • Metropolitan Area
Open Access

Urban policy for large cities in England – the example of Manchester

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 152 - 167

Abstract

Abstract

When elected in 1997, the British Labour Government made urban policy one of its key policy concerns. Criticism of the shortcomings of previous, predominantly market oriented urban policy, was combined with new approaches to state action. Numerous programmes were developed, new institutions created and urban policy initiatives were launched which are still reflected in both national and municipal urban policy in England. The urban policy of the Blair government has received an overall favourable assessment in recent evaluative reports. Such studies conclude that in the towns and cities social cohesion has grown over the last ten years, they have become mare competitive and the quality of life, which in England is commonly defined in relation to the quality of public space, has risen. This article outlines the main features of this urban policy over the last ten years. It takes the example of Manchester’s urban policy, widely regarded as a particularly successful and notable case, to demonstrate policy outcomes.

Keywords

  • England
  • National Urban Policy
  • Labour-Government
  • Urban Regeneration
  • Manchester
Open Access

A few factors in understanding French town planning

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 168 - 177

Abstract

Abstract

Current affairs have lately shone a less-than-flattering light on various events associated with French planning, but without giving much illumination to the reasons behind them. It is difficult to decode the deep-rooted causes of these phenomena without knowing about the historical, political and administrative context of French planning. We also need to understand the new political issues that are arising and the economic levers acting on a European scale, such as the emergence of new global private operators interacting with local contacts in terms of fundraising, management and urban design.

Keywords

  • France
  • Urban Planning
  • History of Urban Development
  • National Urban Policy
Open Access

Challenges to national urban policies in the Netherlands

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 178 - 190

Abstract

Abstract

Recently, a new consensus about the role of cities as the motors of the regional, national and European economy has emerged. However, there is also substantial evidence that social problems are growing in many cities. Linking economic competitiveness to increasing social inclusion is a crucial challenge for policy-makers at all levels of government. The article intends to shed light on the way the Dutch central government tries to support cities to develop into sustainable, vital, complete and competitive entities. As response to a powerful plea by the largest cities themselves, an integrated policy (linking spatial, economic, social, environmental and safety policies) explicitly focused on cities, was given shape. Prime issues are covenants between central government and each city, based on tailor-made long-term strategies, including measurable objectives. To get a clear picture of the policy’s effectiveness – after 13 years of experience – appears to be difficult. Reviewers argue that a lot of aspects could be improved. For the current phase most of these comments have been taken into account.

Keywords

  • The Netherlands
  • National Urban Policy
  • Integrated Urban Development
  • Lisbon Agenda
Open Access

Urban development problems of the new Central European EU member states

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 191 - 204

Abstract

Abstract

The transition from socialist to market-oriented economies after 1990 brought about farranging changes in Central European cities with locally and regionally selective effects. The capital areas that profited a lot from those trends were only partly successful in strategically influencing spatial development. Therefore the remarkable upgrading of inner cities was accompanied by unintended effects somewhat similar to known development patterns in the West such as suburban sprawl. After the enlargement of the EU in 2004 and with the upcoming socio-spatial polarisation there is an increasing need for state-funded regeneration strategies that should contribute to overcoming the lack of integrated urban policies prevailing in many of the accession states.

Keywords

  • Urban Development
  • Central Europe
  • Economic and Political Transformation
  • National Urban Policy
  • Housing Policy
  • Urban Regeneration

Rezensionen, neue Literatur

Article

Open Access

Buchanzeigen

Published Online: 31 Mar 2008
Page range: 214 - 214

Abstract

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