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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

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Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

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Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

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Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

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Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

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Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

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Volume 62 (2004): Issue 1 (January 2004)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

10 Articles

Wissenschaftliche Beiträge

Open Access

The Countryside and the Encroaching Urban Fringe

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 319 - 333

Abstract

Abstract

There remains today little in common between the concept underlying the phenomenon we refer to as “the city”, on the one hand, and the actual reality we can observe and experience. One reason for this is the apparently insatiable desire on the part of large groups in society for a home of their own in a leafy environment; for distance from the hectic, noisy, polluted and increasingly hazardous city centre; for greater closeness to nature; for a sense of belonging to a community, which is seen to guarantee greater security, peace and quiet and social homogeneity; for an environment more child-friendly than that found in the inner city. In stark contrast to any discourse on the subject of urbanity — and reaffirmed impressively yet again just recently in both surveys and empirical studies — for many people a home of their own, with garden, is now well established as the very epitome of how they would ideally like to live. And it is this — admittedly among other factors — which generates suburbanisation. Even accepting that sprawling settlement development by no means represents a lack of planning, but is rather the result of conflicting and — over the course of time — mutually neutralising values with regard to what we think cities can and should be; and granting too that every municipality thinks first and foremost — as indeed it is required to — of its own best interests: nonetheless, what we refer to as “urban sprawl” should not simply be stigmatised or accepted as an unalterable fact of life. On the contrary: suburbanisation needs to be seen, to a much greater degree than has previously been the case, as a challenge for urban development, as a sign of a need to envision spatial concepts which take into account both the housing market and individual aspirations with regard to housing.

Open Access

Challenges in Urban Property Development against the background of changes in the real estate industry

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 334 - 344

Abstract

Abstract

Up to the 1980s, urban property development and management in Western Europe was structured by local conditions and actors. This has changed due to strengthened demand for office space, new forms of real estate financing and an increased market transparency as a consequence of political deregulation. At present, these changes go along with a mobilization of the urban property market and a shift from an use value perspective to an exchange value orientation. What kind of challenges and possibilities arise from these transformations for the urban property development? Does an increased importance of supraregional and shareholder value oriented property developers and investors imply a dependency of urban (property) development on mobile investments? In this article these questions will be answered by analyzing the effects of the reorganization of the real estate industry and the restructuring of urban policy.

Open Access

Land Consumption in Germany in Comparison with the Situation in England

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 345 - 356

Abstract

Abstract

A comparison of the differences in land consumption in England and Germany as well as an analysis of the general conditions of the English planning system show how blatant the differences between the two industrial countries are and deliver the initial explanations for the differences. In the year 2001, 40ha/year/100,000 residents were consumed in Germany (not considering recreational areas). In contrast, the corresponding statistic in England was merely 12.7 ha. The essential reasons for the success of the English system in this area of policy making seems to lie in: the English planning system, the emphasis of recycling unused plots of land within towns and the preservation of “Green Belts” as well as the English taxation system. The English example gives reason to once again contemplate the relatively high strength of community planning interests in German spatial planning. Also without major changes in the planning system, measures such as the reduction of economic incentives that promote land consumption and the further development of concepts for tradable land use permits in connection/cooperation/combination with spatial planning.

Open Access

From Monitoring to Controlling

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 357 - 370

Abstract

Abstract

Sustainability indicators are regarded as vital instruments for the successful implementation of sustainable spatial development. However, many previous approaches have limited themselves to an essentially descriptive or reporting function. The fact that many concepts fail to go beyond enumerating desirable indicators has meant that in most cases these indicators do not end up being properly integrated within the planning and decision-making processes of regional and state-level spatial planning. This article discusses a number of possible ways of refining sustainability indicators as demonstrated by a monitoring and controlling system for the land-use type ”commercial space“. Whereas other studies on the topic of regional sustainability indicators have tended to concentrate primarily on the goal of regional comparisons and rankings, the approach discussed here aims to show how indicators may be put to use as tools within the planning process. Consequently, the monitoring- and controlling-based approach is not presented simply in abstract or theoretical terms, but is rather underpinned by a review of the results of its application in the Eastern Thuringia region as an illustration of the benefits it promises for planning practice.

Open Access

The Spatial Planning Contract as an Instrument to Secure Co-operations in the Central Place System

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 371 - 378

Abstract

Abstract

The article considers the question to what extent co-operations can strengthen the central place system as a concept of spatial planning. The legitimacy of the central place system as part of classical spatial planning that acts in a sovereign way is questioned. Here the focus is put on the application of the principle of functionality instead of the conventional principle of territoriality in the allocation of central place functions. The policy impacts of urban associations and shared central places that have been tested in spatial planning practice in this respect suffer from the lack of a binding agreement on the distribution of functions. In this context the author introduces the spatial planning contract as a possible solution and discusses it using the example of the Dessau area.

Berichte aus Forschung und Praxis

Open Access

Precautionary Flood Protection as an Element of Regional Planning in North Rhine-Westphalia

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 379 - 394

Abstract

Abstract

The catastrophic flooding of recent years has revealed the inadequacy of formally defined flood-protection areas as a means of guaranteeing the necessary levels of containment in water meadows. If we are to effectively alleviate the gravity of such critical cases of flooding, it will be necessary both to restore the water-retention spaces previously maintained, and also to create additional flood plains. As a precautionary measure, where land has already been earmarked (including for development) to serve these purposes, it will be particularly vital to ensure that this intention is not thwarted by permitting conflicting land uses. This is the prime task of regional planning, and, in the form of what are termed „area development plans”, it has at its disposal in North Rhine-Westphalia a sophisticated and effective array of planning instruments capable of meeting the key requirement of precautionary flood protection, namely that of securing the spaces required, initially by indicating them as „flood areas”, and subsequently by designating them specifically for this purpose within legally-binding land-use plans. This article describes the scope for action available in spatial planning as reflected in regional planning in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

Open Access

Für einen Perspektivenwechsel: Die Potenziale des Alters als Triebkräfte gesellschaftlicher Entwicklung

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 395 - 403

Abstract

Kurzfassung

In Verbindung mit der Mitgliederversammlung der Akademie für Raumforschung und Landesplanung traf am 14. Mai 2003 in Erfurt das Präsidium der Akademie zu einem Gespräch mit den älteren ordentlichen Mitgliedern zusammen. Impulse zu einer lebhaften Diskussion gab ein Vortrag des Verfassers. Die dort vorgetragenen Materialien und Überlegungen werden hiermit in überarbeiteter Form vorgelegt.

Article

Open Access

Rezensionen

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 404 - 412

Abstract

Open Access

Buchanzeigen

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 413 - 413

Abstract

Open Access

Auswahldokumentation neuer Literatur

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 414 - 419

Abstract

10 Articles

Wissenschaftliche Beiträge

Open Access

The Countryside and the Encroaching Urban Fringe

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 319 - 333

Abstract

Abstract

There remains today little in common between the concept underlying the phenomenon we refer to as “the city”, on the one hand, and the actual reality we can observe and experience. One reason for this is the apparently insatiable desire on the part of large groups in society for a home of their own in a leafy environment; for distance from the hectic, noisy, polluted and increasingly hazardous city centre; for greater closeness to nature; for a sense of belonging to a community, which is seen to guarantee greater security, peace and quiet and social homogeneity; for an environment more child-friendly than that found in the inner city. In stark contrast to any discourse on the subject of urbanity — and reaffirmed impressively yet again just recently in both surveys and empirical studies — for many people a home of their own, with garden, is now well established as the very epitome of how they would ideally like to live. And it is this — admittedly among other factors — which generates suburbanisation. Even accepting that sprawling settlement development by no means represents a lack of planning, but is rather the result of conflicting and — over the course of time — mutually neutralising values with regard to what we think cities can and should be; and granting too that every municipality thinks first and foremost — as indeed it is required to — of its own best interests: nonetheless, what we refer to as “urban sprawl” should not simply be stigmatised or accepted as an unalterable fact of life. On the contrary: suburbanisation needs to be seen, to a much greater degree than has previously been the case, as a challenge for urban development, as a sign of a need to envision spatial concepts which take into account both the housing market and individual aspirations with regard to housing.

Open Access

Challenges in Urban Property Development against the background of changes in the real estate industry

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 334 - 344

Abstract

Abstract

Up to the 1980s, urban property development and management in Western Europe was structured by local conditions and actors. This has changed due to strengthened demand for office space, new forms of real estate financing and an increased market transparency as a consequence of political deregulation. At present, these changes go along with a mobilization of the urban property market and a shift from an use value perspective to an exchange value orientation. What kind of challenges and possibilities arise from these transformations for the urban property development? Does an increased importance of supraregional and shareholder value oriented property developers and investors imply a dependency of urban (property) development on mobile investments? In this article these questions will be answered by analyzing the effects of the reorganization of the real estate industry and the restructuring of urban policy.

Open Access

Land Consumption in Germany in Comparison with the Situation in England

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 345 - 356

Abstract

Abstract

A comparison of the differences in land consumption in England and Germany as well as an analysis of the general conditions of the English planning system show how blatant the differences between the two industrial countries are and deliver the initial explanations for the differences. In the year 2001, 40ha/year/100,000 residents were consumed in Germany (not considering recreational areas). In contrast, the corresponding statistic in England was merely 12.7 ha. The essential reasons for the success of the English system in this area of policy making seems to lie in: the English planning system, the emphasis of recycling unused plots of land within towns and the preservation of “Green Belts” as well as the English taxation system. The English example gives reason to once again contemplate the relatively high strength of community planning interests in German spatial planning. Also without major changes in the planning system, measures such as the reduction of economic incentives that promote land consumption and the further development of concepts for tradable land use permits in connection/cooperation/combination with spatial planning.

Open Access

From Monitoring to Controlling

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 357 - 370

Abstract

Abstract

Sustainability indicators are regarded as vital instruments for the successful implementation of sustainable spatial development. However, many previous approaches have limited themselves to an essentially descriptive or reporting function. The fact that many concepts fail to go beyond enumerating desirable indicators has meant that in most cases these indicators do not end up being properly integrated within the planning and decision-making processes of regional and state-level spatial planning. This article discusses a number of possible ways of refining sustainability indicators as demonstrated by a monitoring and controlling system for the land-use type ”commercial space“. Whereas other studies on the topic of regional sustainability indicators have tended to concentrate primarily on the goal of regional comparisons and rankings, the approach discussed here aims to show how indicators may be put to use as tools within the planning process. Consequently, the monitoring- and controlling-based approach is not presented simply in abstract or theoretical terms, but is rather underpinned by a review of the results of its application in the Eastern Thuringia region as an illustration of the benefits it promises for planning practice.

Open Access

The Spatial Planning Contract as an Instrument to Secure Co-operations in the Central Place System

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 371 - 378

Abstract

Abstract

The article considers the question to what extent co-operations can strengthen the central place system as a concept of spatial planning. The legitimacy of the central place system as part of classical spatial planning that acts in a sovereign way is questioned. Here the focus is put on the application of the principle of functionality instead of the conventional principle of territoriality in the allocation of central place functions. The policy impacts of urban associations and shared central places that have been tested in spatial planning practice in this respect suffer from the lack of a binding agreement on the distribution of functions. In this context the author introduces the spatial planning contract as a possible solution and discusses it using the example of the Dessau area.

Berichte aus Forschung und Praxis

Open Access

Precautionary Flood Protection as an Element of Regional Planning in North Rhine-Westphalia

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 379 - 394

Abstract

Abstract

The catastrophic flooding of recent years has revealed the inadequacy of formally defined flood-protection areas as a means of guaranteeing the necessary levels of containment in water meadows. If we are to effectively alleviate the gravity of such critical cases of flooding, it will be necessary both to restore the water-retention spaces previously maintained, and also to create additional flood plains. As a precautionary measure, where land has already been earmarked (including for development) to serve these purposes, it will be particularly vital to ensure that this intention is not thwarted by permitting conflicting land uses. This is the prime task of regional planning, and, in the form of what are termed „area development plans”, it has at its disposal in North Rhine-Westphalia a sophisticated and effective array of planning instruments capable of meeting the key requirement of precautionary flood protection, namely that of securing the spaces required, initially by indicating them as „flood areas”, and subsequently by designating them specifically for this purpose within legally-binding land-use plans. This article describes the scope for action available in spatial planning as reflected in regional planning in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

Open Access

Für einen Perspektivenwechsel: Die Potenziale des Alters als Triebkräfte gesellschaftlicher Entwicklung

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 395 - 403

Abstract

Kurzfassung

In Verbindung mit der Mitgliederversammlung der Akademie für Raumforschung und Landesplanung traf am 14. Mai 2003 in Erfurt das Präsidium der Akademie zu einem Gespräch mit den älteren ordentlichen Mitgliedern zusammen. Impulse zu einer lebhaften Diskussion gab ein Vortrag des Verfassers. Die dort vorgetragenen Materialien und Überlegungen werden hiermit in überarbeiteter Form vorgelegt.

Article

Open Access

Rezensionen

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 404 - 412

Abstract

Open Access

Buchanzeigen

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 413 - 413

Abstract

Open Access

Auswahldokumentation neuer Literatur

Published Online: 30 Sep 2003
Page range: 414 - 419

Abstract

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