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AHEAD OF PRINT

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 2 (April 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 5 (October 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 4 (August 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 3 (June 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 2 (April 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 1 (February 2010)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 5-6 (September 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 4 (July 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 3 (May 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 2 (March 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 1 (January 2009)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 6 (November 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 5 (September 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 4 (July 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 3 (May 2008)

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Volume 66 (2008): Issue 1 (January 2008)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 6 (November 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 5 (September 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 4 (July 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 3 (May 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 2 (March 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 1 (January 2007)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 6 (November 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 5 (September 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 4 (July 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 3 (May 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 2 (March 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 1 (January 2006)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 6 (November 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 5 (September 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 4 (July 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 3 (May 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 2 (March 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 1 (January 2005)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 4-5 (September 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 2 (March 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 1 (January 2004)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

9 Articles

Wissenschaftliche Beiträge

Open Access

Knowledge cities and science parks

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 139 - 149

Abstract

Abstract

Basing on the indicator density of high research and development (R&D) and its spatial distribution in Germany, the article presents a typology of knowledge-based settlements. University-campi, technology parks, science parks, science cities and knowledge-based city landscapes are to be distinguished. The article questions its effects in regard to general trends of suburbanisation, desurbanisation and reurbanisation within city regions. Concluding, the author reflects to what extend it seems possible to stimulate innovative milieus by planning categories as proximity, mixed-uses and density.

Open Access

Sustainability and GIS

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 150 - 159

Abstract

Abstract

The ongoing consumption of open space for settlement and traffic purposes is to be solved by integrating new economic control instruments as well as improved information instruments. The latter combined with spatially small-scaled indicators should be used in order to specify objectives of a sustainable settlement development and to bring these into practise. An example for this is given with the „Information System Sustainable Settlement Development”, a decision support system for the municipal planning process.

Open Access

How well perform the large East German cities in comparison to West German cities?

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 160 - 169

Abstract

Abstract

In this article the 13 largest East German cities (without Berlin) are compared with cities of similar size in three West German regions (South, Central, North) with respect to their economic and financial situation. The indicators show a differentiated picture. The GDP of the East German cities surmounts that of the Ruhr cities, but is still far below of the cities in the South. Unemployment and migration loss is most pronounced in the East German cities. Nevertheless they dispose of several favorite preconditions for growth in the future: their endowment with qualified human capital, public research and with enterprise-oriented services is above average. This contrasts with a low density of firms. The East German cities have a weak tax base and are disproportionally dependent on financial assignments by the state. Besides the East German cities the data show another “problem group” consisting of the cities of the Ruhr. The disparities between the West German Regions discovered in the 80s are still existing.

Open Access

Between gentrification and downward spiral

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 170 - 184

Abstract

Abstract

Based on a comparative analysis of different types of housing quarters in the large city regions Leipzig, Dresden and Chemnitz in Saxony, the question was considered to what extent the socio-spatial division in the city regions has already taken place at the end of the 1990's, how high the degree of satisfaction is among the inhabitants of the housing quarters and which development trends could result from the potential intentions to move out. As a result of the great dynamics of selective migrations/moves it became clear that the social segregation of the housing quarters is already far advanced. In addition to the forecast developments in the large housing estates, where a process of decline is partly already reinforcing itself continuously, further problematic developments of housing quarters are emerging in the ordinary areas from the period of industrial expansion and — which has been completely ignored in previous considerations so far — in some new suburban housing estates.

Berichte aus Praxis und Forschung

Open Access

Land loss down to thirty hectares per day

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 185 - 197

Abstract

Abstract

The National Strategy for Sustainability envisages a reduction in the amount of land currently being lost to development to just 30 hectares per day by 2020. This is an extremely ambitious target and raises the question as to just what challenges regions will face in striving to implement this objective. In order to explore this question, land consumption in the past is compared and contrasted with permissible future land consumption within the framework of a “bussiness-as-usual” scenario; using a range of indicators, the interdependencies between land consumption and economic development are described. In discussing their findings, the authors present a number of patterns of requirements for regional adaptation and discuss options available through spatial-structure policy for achieving the 30-hectare target.

Open Access

The Hamburg metropolitan region

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 198 - 210

Abstract

Abstract

There are very few regions in Germany today where the current discussion on future demographic developments is not being conducted against the backdrop of looming shrinkage or — at the very least — stagnation. With a population of over four million, the Hamburg metropolitan region is, however, one of these rare cases. All the signs here augur growth — both in the core city and in the surrounding area. The absence of any evident symptoms of a serious crisis possibly goes some way to explaining why there currently appear to be no significant impulses to embark on further steps towards consolidation of the region. Although clear progress has been recorded over recent years in respect of co-operation within the Hamburg metropolitan region, structural limits exist which cannot be overcome. This article present a critical appraisal of achievements to date and outlines perspectives for the future development of the Hamburg metropolitan region.

Open Access

Accessibilities and population potentials of “central place”

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 211 - 222

Abstract

Abstract

In the course of up-dating the State Development Plan for the federal state of Thuringia, and against the backdrop of dwindling populations and improvements in accessibility, the decision was taken to overhaul the “central-place” concept introduced in 1993. Drawing on accessibility analyses based on private-car use, the future population potentials of so-called “higher-order centres” have been recalculated in order to gauge the long-term significance of such centres for spatial planning within the state. In the light of current levels of infrastructure endowment and capacity utilisation, the authors are able to proceed to formulating recommendations for a future system of “central places” which strives to mediate between blanket supply and economic viability. The current and anticipated shortcomings thus revealed in respect of accessibility provide important pointers toward the types of supplementary structure-policy measures which the state will need to adopt in the future.

Neue Literatur

Open Access

Rezensionen

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 223 - 226

Abstract

Open Access

Auswahldokumentation neuer Literatur

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 227 - 233

Abstract

9 Articles

Wissenschaftliche Beiträge

Open Access

Knowledge cities and science parks

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 139 - 149

Abstract

Abstract

Basing on the indicator density of high research and development (R&D) and its spatial distribution in Germany, the article presents a typology of knowledge-based settlements. University-campi, technology parks, science parks, science cities and knowledge-based city landscapes are to be distinguished. The article questions its effects in regard to general trends of suburbanisation, desurbanisation and reurbanisation within city regions. Concluding, the author reflects to what extend it seems possible to stimulate innovative milieus by planning categories as proximity, mixed-uses and density.

Open Access

Sustainability and GIS

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 150 - 159

Abstract

Abstract

The ongoing consumption of open space for settlement and traffic purposes is to be solved by integrating new economic control instruments as well as improved information instruments. The latter combined with spatially small-scaled indicators should be used in order to specify objectives of a sustainable settlement development and to bring these into practise. An example for this is given with the „Information System Sustainable Settlement Development”, a decision support system for the municipal planning process.

Open Access

How well perform the large East German cities in comparison to West German cities?

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 160 - 169

Abstract

Abstract

In this article the 13 largest East German cities (without Berlin) are compared with cities of similar size in three West German regions (South, Central, North) with respect to their economic and financial situation. The indicators show a differentiated picture. The GDP of the East German cities surmounts that of the Ruhr cities, but is still far below of the cities in the South. Unemployment and migration loss is most pronounced in the East German cities. Nevertheless they dispose of several favorite preconditions for growth in the future: their endowment with qualified human capital, public research and with enterprise-oriented services is above average. This contrasts with a low density of firms. The East German cities have a weak tax base and are disproportionally dependent on financial assignments by the state. Besides the East German cities the data show another “problem group” consisting of the cities of the Ruhr. The disparities between the West German Regions discovered in the 80s are still existing.

Open Access

Between gentrification and downward spiral

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 170 - 184

Abstract

Abstract

Based on a comparative analysis of different types of housing quarters in the large city regions Leipzig, Dresden and Chemnitz in Saxony, the question was considered to what extent the socio-spatial division in the city regions has already taken place at the end of the 1990's, how high the degree of satisfaction is among the inhabitants of the housing quarters and which development trends could result from the potential intentions to move out. As a result of the great dynamics of selective migrations/moves it became clear that the social segregation of the housing quarters is already far advanced. In addition to the forecast developments in the large housing estates, where a process of decline is partly already reinforcing itself continuously, further problematic developments of housing quarters are emerging in the ordinary areas from the period of industrial expansion and — which has been completely ignored in previous considerations so far — in some new suburban housing estates.

Berichte aus Praxis und Forschung

Open Access

Land loss down to thirty hectares per day

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 185 - 197

Abstract

Abstract

The National Strategy for Sustainability envisages a reduction in the amount of land currently being lost to development to just 30 hectares per day by 2020. This is an extremely ambitious target and raises the question as to just what challenges regions will face in striving to implement this objective. In order to explore this question, land consumption in the past is compared and contrasted with permissible future land consumption within the framework of a “bussiness-as-usual” scenario; using a range of indicators, the interdependencies between land consumption and economic development are described. In discussing their findings, the authors present a number of patterns of requirements for regional adaptation and discuss options available through spatial-structure policy for achieving the 30-hectare target.

Open Access

The Hamburg metropolitan region

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 198 - 210

Abstract

Abstract

There are very few regions in Germany today where the current discussion on future demographic developments is not being conducted against the backdrop of looming shrinkage or — at the very least — stagnation. With a population of over four million, the Hamburg metropolitan region is, however, one of these rare cases. All the signs here augur growth — both in the core city and in the surrounding area. The absence of any evident symptoms of a serious crisis possibly goes some way to explaining why there currently appear to be no significant impulses to embark on further steps towards consolidation of the region. Although clear progress has been recorded over recent years in respect of co-operation within the Hamburg metropolitan region, structural limits exist which cannot be overcome. This article present a critical appraisal of achievements to date and outlines perspectives for the future development of the Hamburg metropolitan region.

Open Access

Accessibilities and population potentials of “central place”

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 211 - 222

Abstract

Abstract

In the course of up-dating the State Development Plan for the federal state of Thuringia, and against the backdrop of dwindling populations and improvements in accessibility, the decision was taken to overhaul the “central-place” concept introduced in 1993. Drawing on accessibility analyses based on private-car use, the future population potentials of so-called “higher-order centres” have been recalculated in order to gauge the long-term significance of such centres for spatial planning within the state. In the light of current levels of infrastructure endowment and capacity utilisation, the authors are able to proceed to formulating recommendations for a future system of “central places” which strives to mediate between blanket supply and economic viability. The current and anticipated shortcomings thus revealed in respect of accessibility provide important pointers toward the types of supplementary structure-policy measures which the state will need to adopt in the future.

Neue Literatur

Open Access

Rezensionen

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 223 - 226

Abstract

Open Access

Auswahldokumentation neuer Literatur

Published Online: 31 Mar 2003
Page range: 227 - 233

Abstract

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