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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

16 Articles

Article

access type Open Access

Rezensionen

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 254 - 260

Abstract

access type Open Access

Buchanzeigen

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 261 - 262

Abstract

access type Open Access

”The Region is Dead – Long Live the Region!”

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 173 - 184

Abstract

Abstract

The inflationary use of the term “region”, observable over the last few years in spatial planning circles, has been accompanied by a new sense of confusion in respect of spatial units. In the absence of convincing definitions of the term “region”, at least of relevance to physical planning, the spatial sciences are called upon to develop a new conception of what is meant by “regions”. The author takes the view that the region should not be (mis)understood simply as a physical section of the earth’s surface, but should rather be viewed as an area characterised by socio-economic integration which defines itself as a loosely connected network through the mutual perception of the actors who operate within it.

access type Open Access

Vorweg

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 87 - 88

Abstract

Beiträge

access type Open Access

Co-ordinating Local-authority and Private-sector Planning

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 185 - 200

Abstract

Abstract

This article investigates the opportunities and threats facing co-ordination in planning, as well as theoretical approaches to the explanation of interdependencies between local authorities and the private sector. It also provides the starting point for further research projects in a sphere of action which — under the label “public/private partnerships” — can be expected to gain in importance in the coming years in the field of economic development aid. A systems-theory approach is adopted to show the nature of the relations between the two groups of actors. Building upon this, the authors then attempt to develop explanatory approaches based on regulation theory to illuminate the dynamic relationship which exists between private-sector companies and local authorities. Their findings lend themselves to quantification applying the methods of game theory.

access type Open Access

”Staged Attractions” Around the Region – A Contribution to the Creation of Regions?

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 201 - 210

Abstract

Abstract

This article outlines some of the manifestations of, and the background to, the notion of “staged attractions” created at a variety of dispersed locations with the intention of strengthening the cohesion of the region which embraces them. Should such “staged” concepts be seen as representing new avenues for the creation of regions? And what consequences do they present for spatial planning? This article describes the conditions under which “staged attractions” are created at various locations within a region and refers to a number of examples from the Stuttgart region to illustrate some of the types which exist. Finally, the author discusses some of the advantages which the use of “staged attractions” in planning may hold and the associated challenges which planners will face in the future.

access type Open Access

Local-authority Partnerships within the Urban Regions of Western Germany: Aspiration and Political Reality

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 211 - 221

Abstract

Abstract

In conurbations, perhaps more than anywhere else, regional co-operation plays a key role in the delivery of local-authority services and tasks. Although, since the 1970s, all of Germany’s urban regions have instituted partnerships to bring together urban authorities and the rural authorities of the surrounding region, in the majority of cases these have been charged solely with co-ordinating the local-authority planning function, and only to a lesser degree with the joint delivery of local-authority services. With the completion of the European single market, many agglomerations have created stand-alone regional companies to work within the economic-development field. Attempts to intensify co-operation in other areas have however failed. Remedies to this problem are seen in varying the boundaries of urban regions and in the active support for voluntary partnerships provided by state governments.

access type Open Access

Projects and Strategies for Developing Open Spaces in Urban Regions

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 222 - 232

Abstract

Abstract

The concept of „green rings” (or greenbelts), created to contain towns and cities, to steer built development and to safeguard open spaces for the benefit of urban populations, is an old one. In the 1990s this long-established concept, along with the strategic approach underlying it, experienced an astonishing renaissance — both as an element of regional strategies and as one component of sustainable development. In this article the authors refer to two cases in point, in Leipzig and in Hanover, to discuss the aims, tasks and procedural approaches associated with this strategy. In examining these examples, it becomes apparent that although great importance is attached to protecting the open spaces available in a region, successful implementation of this strategy calls for an expansion of the current perception of the task involved and of the procedures to be adopted.

access type Open Access

Developments in Commuting in the Municipalities of Lower Saxony between 1987 and 1998

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 233 - 243

Abstract

Abstract

This article reports on a study of changes in commuting patterns in Lower Saxony between 1987 and 1998. During this period the average commute increased in distance by 10 % to 10.7 km. Regional differences between agglomeration and rural areas have largely disappeared. The average amount of time taken to travel between home and work has remained almost constant for 25 years at slightly over half an hour; in other words, commuters have managed to avoid spending more time travelling to and from work. This has been achieved by an unmistakable increase in private-car use, which is reflected in a rise in motorised private traffic levels of some 25 %.

access type Open Access

What is the Driving Force?

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 244 - 253

Abstract

Abstract

Great expectations are currently being pinned on towns and urban regions with regard to the crucial part ascribed to them in shaping the competitive environment in both European and global terms. They are the “engines” which deliver creative solutions and perform myriad feats of integration regarded as vital to maintaining economic competitiveness. The theoretical debate on the functioning of regional economies reflects this view and is constantly increasing the number of aspects which it includes in its model studies. Two examples are the local innovative milieu investigated by the GREMI research group, and the discussion on urban governance. Both models are concerned with the description and analysis of structures and actions in regions and towns. Irrespective of differences between the specific norms which apply to the two models, in a more fundamental sense these are the issues of the future: Faced with the complexity of the competitive environment, how will it be possible for urban regions to create and to maintain the ability to shape themselves?

access type Open Access

Regional Management as the Driving Force behind Sustainable Spatial Development

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 89 - 102

Abstract

Abstract

This article is based on a research study into the evaluation of regional management in the rural county of Rottal-Inn, which serves as a starting point for a discussion on the potential offered by regional management to “accelerate” sustainable spatial development. It begins with a critical analysis of the principles and postulates of the vision of sustainable spatial development and of the current state of implementation of this vision in Germany, in particular with regard to more comprehensive spatial planning. The article then goes on to focus in turn on the origins, content and organisation of regional management in Rottal-Inn, as well as on its effectiveness with regard to projects it has been applied to and its managerial efficiency; this in turn leads into a discussion of the contribution of process- and implementation-orientated regional management to sustainable spatial development. Departing from the view occasionally encountered which might be expressed as ”Regional planning is dead — long live regional management”, the authors conclude by drawing some conclusions regarding area-specific regional management and its links to regional planning.

access type Open Access

A Geochemical View of Complex Analyses of Fluxes of Harmful Substances as a Basis for Sustainable Urban Planning

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 103 - 129

Abstract

Abstract

Accompanying the global trend towards urbanisation are increasing levels of environmental pollution resulting from the constantly rising volumes of harmful substances being emitted. Most severely affected by these are the soil, water courses, the atmosphere, flora and fauna — and the quality of life for humans. In order to safeguard quality of life, there is a pressing need for extensive and comprehensive knowledge of pollutant fluxes, culminating in an integrated strategy for pollutant management, in particular to protect the environment in towns and cities through the effective regulation of fluxes of harmful substances. The authors draw on cases studies covering specific aspects of material-flow analysis and define the key parameters in an attempt to describe an interdisciplinary approach towards the development of a management system for harmful substances applicable in urban areas.

access type Open Access

Development in Rural Areas

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 130 - 138

Abstract

Abstract

This article discusses the concept underlying Special Research Area 522 — “Environment and Region”, set up in July 1999 at the University of Trier. Since the work of this special research area is still in its initial stages, the author, the co-ordinator of this research area, is not yet in a position to present concrete findings. The focus of the article lies rather in outlining the substantive framework for the first and subsequent phases of funding.

access type Open Access

The Content and Structure of Regional Masterplans

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 139 - 149

Abstract

Abstract

Under section 9 para. 6 of the German Federal Regional Planning Act (theRaumordnungsgesetz — ROG) it is possible for a single plan to perform the functions both of a regional plan and of a joint (i.e. inter-authority) masterplan (or “preparatory land-use plan” in this case a regional masterplan). In providing this option, the legislature was reacting to the requirements of more efficient planning and for closer co-ordination of the various tiers of planning. In this article the regional masterplan is discussed as a new instrument of regional and land-use planning. Within this context the article identifies normative planning elements of regional masterplanning, which are exemplified in more concrete terms by reference to the Munich region. The article discusses such issues as the matter to be included in the textual component of the plan, as well as the cartographic representation of the regional masterplan. It concludes by pointing out a number of problem areas in implementation and discussing attempts at finding solutions.

access type Open Access

Sustainable, Regional, Developed?

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 150 - 160

Abstract

Abstract

The first section of this article deals with the concept of “sustainability” and examines the broader conditions affecting strategies to bring about sustainable regional development. Part Two extends the discussion to include the two lead projects undertaken in the Pyhrn-Eisenwurzen region of Austria— the “Kalkalpen National Park” and the State Exhibition entitled “Land of the Hammers”. Part Three draws on the product-cycle model in an attempt to identify potential breaks with the trends of development found in Pyhrn-Eisenwurzen. The article concludes by presenting some general conclusions regarding the status and prospects of a policy of sustainable regional development in Europe.

access type Open Access

Creative Milieus as Factors of Regional Development

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 161 - 172

Abstract

Abstract

This article deals with the question of what can be learnt for future regional development from the discussion on what are referred to as “creative milieus”, and with how these lessons can assist with the framing of integrated approaches to regional policy (“milieu-orientated regional policy”). But are there not also (regional) milieus which — far from being creative or innovative — are hostile to innovation, or even “sclerotic”? The author shows that it is possible to proceed from the assumption of a life-cycle for regional milieus within a heuristic model and that specific factors have to be developed in order for a milieu to be capable of being deemed “creative”. The article concludes with a number of propositions and reflections on how creative milieus can be promoted and on their relevance for regional policy.

16 Articles

Article

access type Open Access

Rezensionen

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 254 - 260

Abstract

access type Open Access

Buchanzeigen

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 261 - 262

Abstract

access type Open Access

”The Region is Dead – Long Live the Region!”

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 173 - 184

Abstract

Abstract

The inflationary use of the term “region”, observable over the last few years in spatial planning circles, has been accompanied by a new sense of confusion in respect of spatial units. In the absence of convincing definitions of the term “region”, at least of relevance to physical planning, the spatial sciences are called upon to develop a new conception of what is meant by “regions”. The author takes the view that the region should not be (mis)understood simply as a physical section of the earth’s surface, but should rather be viewed as an area characterised by socio-economic integration which defines itself as a loosely connected network through the mutual perception of the actors who operate within it.

access type Open Access

Vorweg

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 87 - 88

Abstract

Beiträge

access type Open Access

Co-ordinating Local-authority and Private-sector Planning

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 185 - 200

Abstract

Abstract

This article investigates the opportunities and threats facing co-ordination in planning, as well as theoretical approaches to the explanation of interdependencies between local authorities and the private sector. It also provides the starting point for further research projects in a sphere of action which — under the label “public/private partnerships” — can be expected to gain in importance in the coming years in the field of economic development aid. A systems-theory approach is adopted to show the nature of the relations between the two groups of actors. Building upon this, the authors then attempt to develop explanatory approaches based on regulation theory to illuminate the dynamic relationship which exists between private-sector companies and local authorities. Their findings lend themselves to quantification applying the methods of game theory.

access type Open Access

”Staged Attractions” Around the Region – A Contribution to the Creation of Regions?

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 201 - 210

Abstract

Abstract

This article outlines some of the manifestations of, and the background to, the notion of “staged attractions” created at a variety of dispersed locations with the intention of strengthening the cohesion of the region which embraces them. Should such “staged” concepts be seen as representing new avenues for the creation of regions? And what consequences do they present for spatial planning? This article describes the conditions under which “staged attractions” are created at various locations within a region and refers to a number of examples from the Stuttgart region to illustrate some of the types which exist. Finally, the author discusses some of the advantages which the use of “staged attractions” in planning may hold and the associated challenges which planners will face in the future.

access type Open Access

Local-authority Partnerships within the Urban Regions of Western Germany: Aspiration and Political Reality

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 211 - 221

Abstract

Abstract

In conurbations, perhaps more than anywhere else, regional co-operation plays a key role in the delivery of local-authority services and tasks. Although, since the 1970s, all of Germany’s urban regions have instituted partnerships to bring together urban authorities and the rural authorities of the surrounding region, in the majority of cases these have been charged solely with co-ordinating the local-authority planning function, and only to a lesser degree with the joint delivery of local-authority services. With the completion of the European single market, many agglomerations have created stand-alone regional companies to work within the economic-development field. Attempts to intensify co-operation in other areas have however failed. Remedies to this problem are seen in varying the boundaries of urban regions and in the active support for voluntary partnerships provided by state governments.

access type Open Access

Projects and Strategies for Developing Open Spaces in Urban Regions

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 222 - 232

Abstract

Abstract

The concept of „green rings” (or greenbelts), created to contain towns and cities, to steer built development and to safeguard open spaces for the benefit of urban populations, is an old one. In the 1990s this long-established concept, along with the strategic approach underlying it, experienced an astonishing renaissance — both as an element of regional strategies and as one component of sustainable development. In this article the authors refer to two cases in point, in Leipzig and in Hanover, to discuss the aims, tasks and procedural approaches associated with this strategy. In examining these examples, it becomes apparent that although great importance is attached to protecting the open spaces available in a region, successful implementation of this strategy calls for an expansion of the current perception of the task involved and of the procedures to be adopted.

access type Open Access

Developments in Commuting in the Municipalities of Lower Saxony between 1987 and 1998

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 233 - 243

Abstract

Abstract

This article reports on a study of changes in commuting patterns in Lower Saxony between 1987 and 1998. During this period the average commute increased in distance by 10 % to 10.7 km. Regional differences between agglomeration and rural areas have largely disappeared. The average amount of time taken to travel between home and work has remained almost constant for 25 years at slightly over half an hour; in other words, commuters have managed to avoid spending more time travelling to and from work. This has been achieved by an unmistakable increase in private-car use, which is reflected in a rise in motorised private traffic levels of some 25 %.

access type Open Access

What is the Driving Force?

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 244 - 253

Abstract

Abstract

Great expectations are currently being pinned on towns and urban regions with regard to the crucial part ascribed to them in shaping the competitive environment in both European and global terms. They are the “engines” which deliver creative solutions and perform myriad feats of integration regarded as vital to maintaining economic competitiveness. The theoretical debate on the functioning of regional economies reflects this view and is constantly increasing the number of aspects which it includes in its model studies. Two examples are the local innovative milieu investigated by the GREMI research group, and the discussion on urban governance. Both models are concerned with the description and analysis of structures and actions in regions and towns. Irrespective of differences between the specific norms which apply to the two models, in a more fundamental sense these are the issues of the future: Faced with the complexity of the competitive environment, how will it be possible for urban regions to create and to maintain the ability to shape themselves?

access type Open Access

Regional Management as the Driving Force behind Sustainable Spatial Development

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 89 - 102

Abstract

Abstract

This article is based on a research study into the evaluation of regional management in the rural county of Rottal-Inn, which serves as a starting point for a discussion on the potential offered by regional management to “accelerate” sustainable spatial development. It begins with a critical analysis of the principles and postulates of the vision of sustainable spatial development and of the current state of implementation of this vision in Germany, in particular with regard to more comprehensive spatial planning. The article then goes on to focus in turn on the origins, content and organisation of regional management in Rottal-Inn, as well as on its effectiveness with regard to projects it has been applied to and its managerial efficiency; this in turn leads into a discussion of the contribution of process- and implementation-orientated regional management to sustainable spatial development. Departing from the view occasionally encountered which might be expressed as ”Regional planning is dead — long live regional management”, the authors conclude by drawing some conclusions regarding area-specific regional management and its links to regional planning.

access type Open Access

A Geochemical View of Complex Analyses of Fluxes of Harmful Substances as a Basis for Sustainable Urban Planning

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 103 - 129

Abstract

Abstract

Accompanying the global trend towards urbanisation are increasing levels of environmental pollution resulting from the constantly rising volumes of harmful substances being emitted. Most severely affected by these are the soil, water courses, the atmosphere, flora and fauna — and the quality of life for humans. In order to safeguard quality of life, there is a pressing need for extensive and comprehensive knowledge of pollutant fluxes, culminating in an integrated strategy for pollutant management, in particular to protect the environment in towns and cities through the effective regulation of fluxes of harmful substances. The authors draw on cases studies covering specific aspects of material-flow analysis and define the key parameters in an attempt to describe an interdisciplinary approach towards the development of a management system for harmful substances applicable in urban areas.

access type Open Access

Development in Rural Areas

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 130 - 138

Abstract

Abstract

This article discusses the concept underlying Special Research Area 522 — “Environment and Region”, set up in July 1999 at the University of Trier. Since the work of this special research area is still in its initial stages, the author, the co-ordinator of this research area, is not yet in a position to present concrete findings. The focus of the article lies rather in outlining the substantive framework for the first and subsequent phases of funding.

access type Open Access

The Content and Structure of Regional Masterplans

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 139 - 149

Abstract

Abstract

Under section 9 para. 6 of the German Federal Regional Planning Act (theRaumordnungsgesetz — ROG) it is possible for a single plan to perform the functions both of a regional plan and of a joint (i.e. inter-authority) masterplan (or “preparatory land-use plan” in this case a regional masterplan). In providing this option, the legislature was reacting to the requirements of more efficient planning and for closer co-ordination of the various tiers of planning. In this article the regional masterplan is discussed as a new instrument of regional and land-use planning. Within this context the article identifies normative planning elements of regional masterplanning, which are exemplified in more concrete terms by reference to the Munich region. The article discusses such issues as the matter to be included in the textual component of the plan, as well as the cartographic representation of the regional masterplan. It concludes by pointing out a number of problem areas in implementation and discussing attempts at finding solutions.

access type Open Access

Sustainable, Regional, Developed?

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 150 - 160

Abstract

Abstract

The first section of this article deals with the concept of “sustainability” and examines the broader conditions affecting strategies to bring about sustainable regional development. Part Two extends the discussion to include the two lead projects undertaken in the Pyhrn-Eisenwurzen region of Austria— the “Kalkalpen National Park” and the State Exhibition entitled “Land of the Hammers”. Part Three draws on the product-cycle model in an attempt to identify potential breaks with the trends of development found in Pyhrn-Eisenwurzen. The article concludes by presenting some general conclusions regarding the status and prospects of a policy of sustainable regional development in Europe.

access type Open Access

Creative Milieus as Factors of Regional Development

Published Online: 31 Mar 2000
Page range: 161 - 172

Abstract

Abstract

This article deals with the question of what can be learnt for future regional development from the discussion on what are referred to as “creative milieus”, and with how these lessons can assist with the framing of integrated approaches to regional policy (“milieu-orientated regional policy”). But are there not also (regional) milieus which — far from being creative or innovative — are hostile to innovation, or even “sclerotic”? The author shows that it is possible to proceed from the assumption of a life-cycle for regional milieus within a heuristic model and that specific factors have to be developed in order for a milieu to be capable of being deemed “creative”. The article concludes with a number of propositions and reflections on how creative milieus can be promoted and on their relevance for regional policy.

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