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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1898-0309
First Published
30 Dec 2008
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 24 (2018): Issue 2 (June 2018)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1898-0309
First Published
30 Dec 2008
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

4 Articles

Scientific Paper

Open Access

The sensitivity of contact stresses in the mandibular premolar region to the shape of Zirconia dental implant: A 3D finite element study

Published Online: 26 Jun 2018
Page range: 55 - 63

Abstract

Abstract

Background: Implant thread profile plays a vital role in magnitude and distribution of contact stresses at the implant-bone interface. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical effects of four distinct thread profiles of a dental implant in the mandibular premolar region.

Methods: The dental implant represented the biocompatible Zirconia material and the bone block was modelled as transversely isotropic and elastic material. Three-dimensional finite element simulations were conducted for four distinct thread profiles of a dental implant at 50%, 75%, and 100% osseointegration. An axial static load of 500 N was applied on the abutment surface to estimate the stresses acting within the bones surrounding the implant.

Results: Regions of stress concentration were seen mostly along the mesiodistal direction compared to that in the buccolingual direction. The cortical bone close to the cervical region of the implant and the cortical bone next to the first thread of the implant experienced peak stress concentration. Increasing the degree of osseointegration resulted in increased von-Mises stresses on the implant-cortical transition region, the implant-cancellous transition region, the cortical bone, and the cancellous bone.

Conclusion: The results show that the application of distinct thread profiles at different degrees of osseointegration had significant effect on the stresses distribution contours in the surrounding bony structure. Comparing all four thread profiles, a dental implant with V-thread profile induced lower values of von-Mises stresses and shear stresses on the implant-cortical transition region, implant-cancellous transition region, cortical bone, and cancellous bone.

Keywords

  • dental implant
  • finite element method
  • osseointegration
  • stress analysis
  • thread profile
Open Access

Hybrid Monte Carlo source model: Advantages and deficiencies

Published Online: 26 Jun 2018
Page range: 65 - 74

Abstract

Abstract

Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is the gold standard for dose calculation. An accurate mathematical source model can be used for the radiation beams. Source models can consist of sub-sources or fewer sources with data that need to be measured. This can speed up treatment plan verification without the need for a full simulation of the radiation treatment machine.

Aims: This study aimed to construct a novel hybrid source model for 6 MV photon beams for an Elekta Synergy accelerator and to commission it against measured beam data and treatments plans.

Methods and Material: The model comprised of a circular photon and planar electron contamination source. The modified Schiff formula provided off-axis variable bremsstrahlung spectra. Collimation and scatter were modelled with error functions. An exponential function modelled the transmitted fluence through the collimators. The source model was commissioned by comparing simulated and measured MC data. Dose data included profiles, depth dose and film measurements in a Rando phantom. Field sizes ranged from 1 × 1 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2.

Results: Regular, wedged and asymmetrical fields could be modelled within 1.5% or 1.5 mm. More than 95% of all points lie within 3% or 3 mm for the multi-leaf collimators contours data. A gamma criterion of 3% or 3 mm was met for a complex treatment case.

Conclusions: The two sub-source model replicated clinical 6 MV Elekta Synergy photons beams and could calculate the dose accurately for conformal treatments in complex geometries such as a head-and-neck case.

Keywords

  • hybrid source model
  • DOSXYZnrc
  • Monte Carlo
  • Elekta Synergy
  • particle source model

Technical Note

Open Access

Evaluation of jaws-only intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment plans using Octavius 4D system

Published Online: 26 Jun 2018
Page range: 75 - 78

Abstract

Abstract

Introduction: Jaws-Only Intensity modulated radiation therapy (JO-IMRT) is a technique uses the collimator jaws of the linear accelerator (LINAC) to delivery of complex intensity patterns. In previous studies, pretreatment patient specific quality assurance for those JO-IMRT were also performed using ionization chamber, MapCHECK2, and Octavius 4D and good agreements were shown. The aim of this study is to further verify JO-IMRT plans in 2 different cases: one with the gantry angle set equal to beam angle as in the plans and the other with gantry angle set to zero degree.

Materials and Methods: Twenty-five JO-IMRT, previously verified, were executed twice for each plan. The first one used a real gantry angle, and the second one used a 0° gantry angle. Measurements were performed using Octavius 4D 1500.

Results: The results were analyzed using Verisoft software. The results show that the Gamma average was 97.32 ± 2.21% for IMRT with a 0° gantry angle and 94.72 ± 2.67% for IMRT with a true gantry angle.

Conclusion: In both cases, gamma index of more than 90% were found for all of our 25 JO-IMRT treatment plans.

Keywords

  • intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)
  • jaws only IMRT (JO-IMRT)
  • quality assurance (QA)
  • Octavius 4D
  • MapCHECK2
Open Access

Open beam dosimetric characteristics of True Beam medical linear accelerator with flattening filter (WFF) and flattening filter free (FFF) beam

Published Online: 26 Jun 2018
Page range: 79 - 89

Abstract

Abstract

True Beam medical linear accelerator is capable of delivering flattening filter free (FFF) and with flattening filter (WFF) photon beams. True Beam linear accelerator is equipped with five photon beam energies (6 FFF, 6 WFF, 10 FFF, 10 WFF and 15 WFF) as well as six electron beam energies (6 MeV, 9 MeV, 12 MeV, 15 MeV and 18 MeV). The maximum dose rate for the 6 WFF, 10 WFF and 15 WFF is 600 MU/min, whereas 6 FFF has a maximum dose rate of 1400 MU/min and 10 FFF with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. In this report we discussed the open beam dosimetric characteristics of True Beam medical linear accelerator with FFF and WFF beam. All the dosimetric data (i.e. depth dose, cross-line profiles, diagonal profiles, output factors, MLC transmission, etc.) for 6 MV, 6 FFF, 10 MV, 10 FFF and 15 MV were measured and compared with the published data of the True Beam. Multiple detectors were used in order to obtain a consistent dataset. The measured data has a good consistency with the reference golden beam data. The measured beam quality index for all the beams are in good agreement with the published data. The percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth of all the available photon beams was within the tolerance of the Varian acceptance specification. The dosimetric data shows consistent and comparable results with the published data of other True Beam linear accelerators. The dosimetric data provide us an appreciated perception and consistent among the published data and may be used for future references.

4 Articles

Scientific Paper

Open Access

The sensitivity of contact stresses in the mandibular premolar region to the shape of Zirconia dental implant: A 3D finite element study

Published Online: 26 Jun 2018
Page range: 55 - 63

Abstract

Abstract

Background: Implant thread profile plays a vital role in magnitude and distribution of contact stresses at the implant-bone interface. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical effects of four distinct thread profiles of a dental implant in the mandibular premolar region.

Methods: The dental implant represented the biocompatible Zirconia material and the bone block was modelled as transversely isotropic and elastic material. Three-dimensional finite element simulations were conducted for four distinct thread profiles of a dental implant at 50%, 75%, and 100% osseointegration. An axial static load of 500 N was applied on the abutment surface to estimate the stresses acting within the bones surrounding the implant.

Results: Regions of stress concentration were seen mostly along the mesiodistal direction compared to that in the buccolingual direction. The cortical bone close to the cervical region of the implant and the cortical bone next to the first thread of the implant experienced peak stress concentration. Increasing the degree of osseointegration resulted in increased von-Mises stresses on the implant-cortical transition region, the implant-cancellous transition region, the cortical bone, and the cancellous bone.

Conclusion: The results show that the application of distinct thread profiles at different degrees of osseointegration had significant effect on the stresses distribution contours in the surrounding bony structure. Comparing all four thread profiles, a dental implant with V-thread profile induced lower values of von-Mises stresses and shear stresses on the implant-cortical transition region, implant-cancellous transition region, cortical bone, and cancellous bone.

Keywords

  • dental implant
  • finite element method
  • osseointegration
  • stress analysis
  • thread profile
Open Access

Hybrid Monte Carlo source model: Advantages and deficiencies

Published Online: 26 Jun 2018
Page range: 65 - 74

Abstract

Abstract

Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is the gold standard for dose calculation. An accurate mathematical source model can be used for the radiation beams. Source models can consist of sub-sources or fewer sources with data that need to be measured. This can speed up treatment plan verification without the need for a full simulation of the radiation treatment machine.

Aims: This study aimed to construct a novel hybrid source model for 6 MV photon beams for an Elekta Synergy accelerator and to commission it against measured beam data and treatments plans.

Methods and Material: The model comprised of a circular photon and planar electron contamination source. The modified Schiff formula provided off-axis variable bremsstrahlung spectra. Collimation and scatter were modelled with error functions. An exponential function modelled the transmitted fluence through the collimators. The source model was commissioned by comparing simulated and measured MC data. Dose data included profiles, depth dose and film measurements in a Rando phantom. Field sizes ranged from 1 × 1 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2.

Results: Regular, wedged and asymmetrical fields could be modelled within 1.5% or 1.5 mm. More than 95% of all points lie within 3% or 3 mm for the multi-leaf collimators contours data. A gamma criterion of 3% or 3 mm was met for a complex treatment case.

Conclusions: The two sub-source model replicated clinical 6 MV Elekta Synergy photons beams and could calculate the dose accurately for conformal treatments in complex geometries such as a head-and-neck case.

Keywords

  • hybrid source model
  • DOSXYZnrc
  • Monte Carlo
  • Elekta Synergy
  • particle source model

Technical Note

Open Access

Evaluation of jaws-only intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment plans using Octavius 4D system

Published Online: 26 Jun 2018
Page range: 75 - 78

Abstract

Abstract

Introduction: Jaws-Only Intensity modulated radiation therapy (JO-IMRT) is a technique uses the collimator jaws of the linear accelerator (LINAC) to delivery of complex intensity patterns. In previous studies, pretreatment patient specific quality assurance for those JO-IMRT were also performed using ionization chamber, MapCHECK2, and Octavius 4D and good agreements were shown. The aim of this study is to further verify JO-IMRT plans in 2 different cases: one with the gantry angle set equal to beam angle as in the plans and the other with gantry angle set to zero degree.

Materials and Methods: Twenty-five JO-IMRT, previously verified, were executed twice for each plan. The first one used a real gantry angle, and the second one used a 0° gantry angle. Measurements were performed using Octavius 4D 1500.

Results: The results were analyzed using Verisoft software. The results show that the Gamma average was 97.32 ± 2.21% for IMRT with a 0° gantry angle and 94.72 ± 2.67% for IMRT with a true gantry angle.

Conclusion: In both cases, gamma index of more than 90% were found for all of our 25 JO-IMRT treatment plans.

Keywords

  • intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)
  • jaws only IMRT (JO-IMRT)
  • quality assurance (QA)
  • Octavius 4D
  • MapCHECK2
Open Access

Open beam dosimetric characteristics of True Beam medical linear accelerator with flattening filter (WFF) and flattening filter free (FFF) beam

Published Online: 26 Jun 2018
Page range: 79 - 89

Abstract

Abstract

True Beam medical linear accelerator is capable of delivering flattening filter free (FFF) and with flattening filter (WFF) photon beams. True Beam linear accelerator is equipped with five photon beam energies (6 FFF, 6 WFF, 10 FFF, 10 WFF and 15 WFF) as well as six electron beam energies (6 MeV, 9 MeV, 12 MeV, 15 MeV and 18 MeV). The maximum dose rate for the 6 WFF, 10 WFF and 15 WFF is 600 MU/min, whereas 6 FFF has a maximum dose rate of 1400 MU/min and 10 FFF with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. In this report we discussed the open beam dosimetric characteristics of True Beam medical linear accelerator with FFF and WFF beam. All the dosimetric data (i.e. depth dose, cross-line profiles, diagonal profiles, output factors, MLC transmission, etc.) for 6 MV, 6 FFF, 10 MV, 10 FFF and 15 MV were measured and compared with the published data of the True Beam. Multiple detectors were used in order to obtain a consistent dataset. The measured data has a good consistency with the reference golden beam data. The measured beam quality index for all the beams are in good agreement with the published data. The percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth of all the available photon beams was within the tolerance of the Varian acceptance specification. The dosimetric data shows consistent and comparable results with the published data of other True Beam linear accelerators. The dosimetric data provide us an appreciated perception and consistent among the published data and may be used for future references.

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