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Volume 68 (2022): Issue 1 (April 2022)

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 4 (December 2021)

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 3 (October 2021)

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 2 (July 2021)

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 1 (April 2021)

Volume 66 (2020): Issue 4 (December 2020)

Volume 66 (2020): Issue 3 (November 2020)

Volume 66 (2020): Issue 2 (July 2020)

Volume 66 (2020): Issue 1 (April 2020)

Volume 65 (2019): Issue 4 (December 2019)

Volume 65 (2019): Issue 3 (October 2019)

Volume 65 (2019): Issue 2 (July 2019)

Volume 65 (2019): Issue 1 (April 2019)

Volume 64 (2018): Issue 4 (December 2018)

Volume 64 (2018): Issue 3 (August 2018)

Volume 64 (2018): Issue 2 (June 2018)

Volume 64 (2018): Issue 1 (April 2018)

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 4 (December 2017)

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 3 (October 2017)

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 2 (August 2017)

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 1 (May 2017)

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 4 (December 2016)

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 3 (October 2016)

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 2 (August 2016)

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 1 (April 2016)

Volume 61 (2015): Issue 4 (December 2015)

Volume 61 (2015): Issue 3 (September 2015)

Volume 61 (2015): Issue 2 (June 2015)

Volume 61 (2015): Issue 1 (March 2015)

Volume 60 (2014): Issue 4 (December 2014)

Volume 60 (2014): Issue 3 (September 2014)

Volume 60 (2014): Issue 2 (June 2014)

Volume 60 (2014): Issue 1 (March 2014)

Volume 59 (2013): Issue 4 (December 2013)

Volume 59 (2013): Issue 3 (September 2013)

Volume 59 (2013): Issue 2 (June 2013)

Volume 59 (2013): Issue 1 (March 2013)

Volume 58 (2012): Issue 4 (December 2012)

Volume 58 (2012): Issue 3 (October 2012)

Volume 58 (2012): Issue 2 (June 2012)

Volume 58 (2012): Issue 1 (March 2012)

Volume 57 (2011): Issue 4 (December 2011)

Volume 57 (2011): Issue 3 (September 2011)

Volume 57 (2011): Issue 2 (June 2011)

Volume 57 (2011): Issue 1 (March 2011)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1338-4376
First Published
06 Jun 2011
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 1 (April 2021)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1338-4376
First Published
06 Jun 2011
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

4 Articles
Open Access

Effects of Ultraviolet-B Radiation in Plant Physiology

Published Online: 24 Jun 2021
Page range: 1 - 15

Abstract

Abstract

Over the past few decades, anthropogenic activities contributed to the depletion of the ozone layer, which increased the levels of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the Earth`s surface. Generally, UV-B is harmful to all living organisms. It damages the cell`s Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), proteins, and lipids, and as a consequence, it affects the bio-membranes negatively. In this review, we summarize the major effects of UV-B in the plant`s main molecules and physiological reactions, in addition to the possible defence mechanisms against UV-B including accumulating UV-B absorbing pigments to alleviate the harmful impact of UV-B.

Keywords

  • ultraviolet-B radiation
  • reactive oxygen species
  • respiration
  • photosynthesis
  • phenolic compounds
Open Access

Chemical and Biogeochemical Features of Desert Soils of the Central Fergana

Published Online: 24 Jun 2021
Page range: 16 - 28

Abstract

Abstract

The Fergana valley is a region critically important for food safety in Central Asia. The human-altered soils in Fergana are considered a key component of the transboundary region between sub-boreal and sub-tropic climatic zones. As the results of the investigation of irrigated chloride-sulfate saline soils near the surface showed the deep petrocalcic and petrosalic horizons at various depths with extremely low water and air permeability. The chemical, pedogeochemical, and biogeochemical properties of soils, the content of macroelements, trace elements, lanthanides and radionuclides, and the general geochemical characteristics of desert zone soils were investigated and determined. The background contents of the mentioned elements were recognized. The irragic, salic, gleyic, and gypsic horizons in soils were identified by WRB 2015. They can be used as reference horizons for biogeochemical studies and soil management activities. The irragic, gleyic, carbonate-gypsum horizons, evaporation, oxygenic, and other geochemical barriers were studied and revealed. The processes of accumulation, migration, and differentiation of chemical elements in solum as well as in parent materials occur with the joint effects of exogenous, endopedogenic, and artificial factors. These fluxes of elements, in turn, are affected by the nature of soils and parent materials. In this process, unexplored elements form only scattering fluxes. During the vegetation season, as well as the leaching period, considering the various horizons features will help to save significant amounts of irrigation water.

Keywords

  • trace elements
  • irrigation
  • geochemical barriers
  • salinization
Open Access

Improving Resistance of Foeniculum Vulgare to Water Deficit Stress by Natural Regulators

Published Online: 24 Jun 2021
Page range: 29 - 41

Abstract

Abstract

This research was conducted as a combined analysis with four replications in two years (2018 ‒ 2019). Treatments were irrigation up to 90%, 50%, and 20% field capacity (as normal irrigation, moderate and severe water deficit stresses, respectively) and foliar application of natural regulators (untreated as control, salicylic acid, spermidine, and methanol). Increasing water deficit stress was led to a significant increase in essential oil percentage and proline content and a significant decrease in yield parameters and seed yield. Most of the traits (except the percentage of essential oil) were affected by natural growth regulators. The highest seed yield (1,127.59 kg/ha), plant biomass (5,426.92 kg/ha), essential oil yield (22.67 kg/ha), and proline content (29.34 μmol/g fresh weight) were obtained in methanol treated plants under normal irrigation. However, the highest amount of these traits under moderate and severe water deficit was recorded for salicylic acid-treated plants. Therefore, foliar spray of methanol was a useful treatment for non-stress conditions, but, application of salicylic acid was the superior treatment for reducing the negative effects of water deficit stress on Foeniculum vulgare.

Keywords

  • essential oil
  • fennel
  • salicylic acid
  • stress
  • yield
Open Access

Optimal and Suitable Conditions for Prospective Spring Camelina Cultivation in Slovakia – Screening by the System of Soil Climatic Units

Published Online: 24 Jun 2021
Page range: 42 - 46

Abstract

Abstract

Camelina [Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz], a recently rediscovered oil crop is becoming of interest to both industry and farmers due to its relatively wide use. The amount of camelina seed production is / will be influenced both by the demand from the industry and by the suitable conditions that allow its profitable cultivation. A preliminary insight on optimal part of the used arable land in Slovakia suitable for growing this crop was based on available information on the environmental requirements of camelina and the system of land evaluation units of agricultural soils. These data have been acquired from database managed and continuously updated by National Agriculture and Food Centre – Soil Science and Conservation Research Institute Bratislava. From this database information concerning the climatic region, slope, soil texture, soil depth, and skeleton content were used. The obtained results show that approximately 27% of the acreage of utilised arable land has optimal quality for spring camelina cultivation in Slovakia. If camelina will be used for the production of various biobased materials, on a smaller scale (several thousand hectares) it is possible to grow this crop without a significant restriction of the cultivation of other crops, especially those intended for food and feed production. In case of camelina utilisation as a feedstock for conventional biofuels production, it is necessary to take into account its competitiveness compared to oilseed rape, which is currently the main raw material for FAME (fatty acid methyl ester) production, both in terms of profitability of cultivation and CO2 emissions per tonne of oilseed yield.

Keywords

  • (l.) crantz
  • climate conditions
  • soil conditions
  • suitability of cultivation
4 Articles
Open Access

Effects of Ultraviolet-B Radiation in Plant Physiology

Published Online: 24 Jun 2021
Page range: 1 - 15

Abstract

Abstract

Over the past few decades, anthropogenic activities contributed to the depletion of the ozone layer, which increased the levels of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the Earth`s surface. Generally, UV-B is harmful to all living organisms. It damages the cell`s Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), proteins, and lipids, and as a consequence, it affects the bio-membranes negatively. In this review, we summarize the major effects of UV-B in the plant`s main molecules and physiological reactions, in addition to the possible defence mechanisms against UV-B including accumulating UV-B absorbing pigments to alleviate the harmful impact of UV-B.

Keywords

  • ultraviolet-B radiation
  • reactive oxygen species
  • respiration
  • photosynthesis
  • phenolic compounds
Open Access

Chemical and Biogeochemical Features of Desert Soils of the Central Fergana

Published Online: 24 Jun 2021
Page range: 16 - 28

Abstract

Abstract

The Fergana valley is a region critically important for food safety in Central Asia. The human-altered soils in Fergana are considered a key component of the transboundary region between sub-boreal and sub-tropic climatic zones. As the results of the investigation of irrigated chloride-sulfate saline soils near the surface showed the deep petrocalcic and petrosalic horizons at various depths with extremely low water and air permeability. The chemical, pedogeochemical, and biogeochemical properties of soils, the content of macroelements, trace elements, lanthanides and radionuclides, and the general geochemical characteristics of desert zone soils were investigated and determined. The background contents of the mentioned elements were recognized. The irragic, salic, gleyic, and gypsic horizons in soils were identified by WRB 2015. They can be used as reference horizons for biogeochemical studies and soil management activities. The irragic, gleyic, carbonate-gypsum horizons, evaporation, oxygenic, and other geochemical barriers were studied and revealed. The processes of accumulation, migration, and differentiation of chemical elements in solum as well as in parent materials occur with the joint effects of exogenous, endopedogenic, and artificial factors. These fluxes of elements, in turn, are affected by the nature of soils and parent materials. In this process, unexplored elements form only scattering fluxes. During the vegetation season, as well as the leaching period, considering the various horizons features will help to save significant amounts of irrigation water.

Keywords

  • trace elements
  • irrigation
  • geochemical barriers
  • salinization
Open Access

Improving Resistance of Foeniculum Vulgare to Water Deficit Stress by Natural Regulators

Published Online: 24 Jun 2021
Page range: 29 - 41

Abstract

Abstract

This research was conducted as a combined analysis with four replications in two years (2018 ‒ 2019). Treatments were irrigation up to 90%, 50%, and 20% field capacity (as normal irrigation, moderate and severe water deficit stresses, respectively) and foliar application of natural regulators (untreated as control, salicylic acid, spermidine, and methanol). Increasing water deficit stress was led to a significant increase in essential oil percentage and proline content and a significant decrease in yield parameters and seed yield. Most of the traits (except the percentage of essential oil) were affected by natural growth regulators. The highest seed yield (1,127.59 kg/ha), plant biomass (5,426.92 kg/ha), essential oil yield (22.67 kg/ha), and proline content (29.34 μmol/g fresh weight) were obtained in methanol treated plants under normal irrigation. However, the highest amount of these traits under moderate and severe water deficit was recorded for salicylic acid-treated plants. Therefore, foliar spray of methanol was a useful treatment for non-stress conditions, but, application of salicylic acid was the superior treatment for reducing the negative effects of water deficit stress on Foeniculum vulgare.

Keywords

  • essential oil
  • fennel
  • salicylic acid
  • stress
  • yield
Open Access

Optimal and Suitable Conditions for Prospective Spring Camelina Cultivation in Slovakia – Screening by the System of Soil Climatic Units

Published Online: 24 Jun 2021
Page range: 42 - 46

Abstract

Abstract

Camelina [Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz], a recently rediscovered oil crop is becoming of interest to both industry and farmers due to its relatively wide use. The amount of camelina seed production is / will be influenced both by the demand from the industry and by the suitable conditions that allow its profitable cultivation. A preliminary insight on optimal part of the used arable land in Slovakia suitable for growing this crop was based on available information on the environmental requirements of camelina and the system of land evaluation units of agricultural soils. These data have been acquired from database managed and continuously updated by National Agriculture and Food Centre – Soil Science and Conservation Research Institute Bratislava. From this database information concerning the climatic region, slope, soil texture, soil depth, and skeleton content were used. The obtained results show that approximately 27% of the acreage of utilised arable land has optimal quality for spring camelina cultivation in Slovakia. If camelina will be used for the production of various biobased materials, on a smaller scale (several thousand hectares) it is possible to grow this crop without a significant restriction of the cultivation of other crops, especially those intended for food and feed production. In case of camelina utilisation as a feedstock for conventional biofuels production, it is necessary to take into account its competitiveness compared to oilseed rape, which is currently the main raw material for FAME (fatty acid methyl ester) production, both in terms of profitability of cultivation and CO2 emissions per tonne of oilseed yield.

Keywords

  • (l.) crantz
  • climate conditions
  • soil conditions
  • suitability of cultivation

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