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Détails du magazine
Format
Magazine
eISSN
1337-9569
Première publication
19 Jun 2009
Période de publication
4 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

Chercher

Volume 8 (2015): Edition 1 (March 2015)

Détails du magazine
Format
Magazine
eISSN
1337-9569
Première publication
19 Jun 2009
Période de publication
4 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

Chercher

8 Articles
Accès libre

Dose-dependent effect of N′-Nitrosodiethylamine on hepatic architecture, RBC rheology and polypeptide repertoire in Wistar rats

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 1 - 7

Résumé

Abstract

N′-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) is an effective hepatotoxicant, carcinogen and mutagen. NDEA-induced hepatic necrosis, through metabolic activation by CYP2E1, is an extensively used experimental model. In the present study, we analysed the dose- and time-dependent effect of NDEA on hepatic damage, RBC rheology and proteomic profile in male Wistar rats. The rats, 5–6 weeks old, were divided into four groups: Group-1 served as control and received normal saline, Group-2 received a single dose of 200 mg/kg body weight NDEA intraperitoneally (i.p.) and the animals were sacrificed after one week; the rats of Group-3 received a single dose of 100 mg/kg body weight NDEA and were sacrificed after one week; Group-4 received 100 mg/kg body weight/wk NDEA for two weeks and were then sacrificed. Various biochemical parameters such as ALT, AST, ALP and bilirubin were determined. Further, RBC rheology, histopathology (H&E staining) of liver biopsies and polypeptide profiling (SDS-PAGE) in sera and liver sections were also carried out both in control and NDEA treated groups. Our results showed a significant increase in all the biochemical parameters of the liver function test (p<0.05). In NDEA treated categories dacryocytes (tear drop cells), schistocytes (fragmented cells), codocytes (target cells), acanthocytes (spur cells) and ovalocytes (oval cells) were observed. H & E stained liver biopsies treated with NDEA showed abnormal liver architecture with severe haemorrhage, neutrophilic infiltration and dysplastic hepatocytes manifested in a dose-dependent manner. Software analysis of SDS-PAGE of control and NDEA treated rat sera and liver revealed qualitative and quantitative differences in polypeptide composition. Based on the presence/absence, polypeptides were classified in three different categories: (1) house-keeping, present in all the groups investigated; (2) novel, present in either control or NDEA treated group at any given time; (3) differential expression, showing quantitative differences. Our study indicates a dose and time-dependent hepatocellular damage and proteome profile which is likely due to NDEA-mediated oxidative stress in rats.

Mots clés

  • hepatotoxicity
  • -Nitrosodiethylamine
  • oxidative stress
  • polypeptide repertoire
  • RBC
  • SDS-PAGE
Accès libre

Antioxidant modulation of nevirapine induced hepatotoxicity in rats

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 8 - 14

Résumé

Abstract

HIV/AIDS related mortality has been dramatically reduced by the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, ART presents with associated adverse effects. One of such adverse effects is hepatotoxicity observed with nevirapine (NVP) containing ART. Since previous studies showed that NVP hepatotoxicity may be due to oxidative stress via generation of oxidative radicals, this study sought to evaluate the protective effects of antioxidants in alleviating NVP induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were divided into 6 groups with 8 animals per group and received doses of the antioxidants jobelyn (10.7 mg/kg/day), vitamin C (8 mg/kg/day), vitamin E (5 mg/kg/day) and/or NVP (6 mg/kg/day) for 60 days. The animals were sacrificed on day 61 by cervical dislocation, blood samples were collected for biochemical and hematological examination. The liver of the sacrificed animals was weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. There was a statistically significant (p<0.05) elevation in MDA level observed in the NVP group as compared with control. The results further showed non-significant decreases in the levels of MDA in the NVP plus antioxidant groups, except vitamin C, when compared with the NVP alone group. Vitamin E and Vitamin E plus C treated groups showed significantly (p<0.05) higher levels of SOD, CAT and GSH. The results also showed statistically significantly (p<0.05) lower levels of ALT and AST in the antioxidant treated groups There was an observed significantly (p<0.05) higher level of TP and urea in the antioxidant treated rats. A significantly (p<0.05) higher white blood cell count was observed in the antioxidant groups. Histopathological assessment of the liver extracted from the rats showed no visible pathology across the groups. Observations from this study suggest a potentially positive modulatory effect of antioxidants and may be indicative for the inclusion of antioxidants in nevirapine containing ART.

Mots clés

  • ART
  • nevirapine
  • jobelyn
  • vitamin C
  • vitamin E
Accès libre

Physiochemical basis of human degenerative disease

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 15 - 21

Résumé

Abstract

The onset of human degenerative diseases in humans, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, neurodevelopmental disease and neurodegenerative disease has been shown to be related to exposures to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and others, as well as to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, bisphenol-A and other aromatic lipophilic species. The onset of these diseases has also been related to exposures to transition metal ions. A physiochemical mechanism for the onset of degenerative environmental disease dependent upon exposure to a combination of lipophilic aromatic hydrocarbons and transition metal ions is proposed here. The findings reported here also, for the first time, explain why aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit greater toxicity than aliphatic hydrocarbons of equal carbon numbers.

Mots clés

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • cancer
  • degenerative environmental disease
  • diabetes
  • membrane permeability
  • toxicity mechanism
Accès libre

Effects of teicoplanin on cell number of cultured cell lines

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 22 - 24

Résumé

Abstract

Teicoplanin is a glycopeptide antibiotic with a wide variation in human serum half-life. It is also a valuable alternative of vancomycin. There is however no study on its effect on cultured cells. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of teicoplanin on cultured cell lines CHO, Jurkat E6.1 and MCF-7. The cultured cells were exposed to teicoplanin at final concentrations of 0–11000 μg/ml for 24 hours. To determine cell viability, the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test was performed. At low concentrations of teicoplanin the numbers of cultured cells (due to cell proliferation) were increased in the three cell lines examined. The maximum cell proliferation rates were observed at concentrations of 1000, 400, and 200 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. Cell toxicity was observed at final concentrations over 2000, 6000, and 400 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. A dose-dependent manner of cell toxicity was observed. Our present findings indicated that teicoplanin at clinically used concentrations induced cell proliferation. It should therefore be used cautiously, particularly in children, pregnant women and patients with cancer.

Mots clés

  • human cell lines
  • MTT
  • proliferation
  • teicoplanin
  • toxicology
Accès libre

Protective effect of Cupressus sempervirens extract against indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 25 - 34

Résumé

Abstract

Cupressus sempervirens (C. sempervirens) belongs to the family Cupressaceae. It is widspread in Northern Africa, Greece, Turkey, North America, Cyprus and Syria. Cupressuflavone is the major ingredient of the plant leave extract. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antiulcerogenic activity of the extract of C. sempervirens leaves in gastric ulcer tissues induced by indomethacin. The results of the present study revealed that indomethacin significantly decreased glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels, while it increased significantly lipid peroxidation (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and protein carbonyl (PC) levels in gastric tissue. Furthermore, indomethacin decreased p53 expression, while it increased bcl-2 expression in gastric tissue. Pretreatment with 5%, 10% & 20% of the LD50 of C. sempervirens and cupressuflavone of indomethacin-treated rats restored all the above parameters to approach normal values. C. sempervirens at the highest dose was more effective than the two lower doses. C. sempervirens proved more potent than cupressuflavone. In conclusion, C. sempervirens exerted antiulcerogenic activity and the effect was dose-dependent and related to the cupressuflavone ingredient of the plant leave extract.

Mots clés

  • gastric ulcer
  • Cupressuflavone
  • antioxidants
  • apoptosis
Accès libre

Probit analysis of comparative assays on toxicities of lead chloride and lead acetate to in vitro cultured human umbilical cord blood lymphocytes

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 35 - 43

Résumé

Abstract

This work describes that cytotoxicity of lead chloride and lead acetate to in vitro cultured lymphocytes from human umbilical cord blood, using four monitoring methods namely, trypan blue staining, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl] 2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and neutral red uptake assays; lead genotoxicity to lymphocytes was monitored by comet assay. The MIC value in each method was invariably 300 mg/L for PbCl2. Lethal concentration25 (LC25) values were almost in an agreeable range: 691.83 to 831.76 mg/L; LC50 values in each method were almost in the range: 1174.9 to 1348.9 mg/L; LC100 values were in the range: 3000 to 3300 mg/L, for lead chloride. Similarly, The MIC value in each method were invariably 150 mg/L; LC25 values were almost in the range: 295.12 to 371.53 mg/L; LC50 values were in the range: 501.18 to 588.84 mg/L; LC100 value was 1500 mg/L in all assays, for lead acetate. The comet assay also indicated that the LC100 values were 3300 mg/L lead chloride and 1500 mg/L lead acetate. Thus, both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were recorded at 3300 mg/L lead chloride and 1500 mg/L lead acetate with lymphocytes.

Mots clés

  • cytotoxicity
  • genotoxicity
  • lead chloride
  • lead acetate
  • AO/EB staining
  • MTT assay
  • comet assay
Accès libre

Endothelium and the effect of activated neutrophils on arterial smooth muscle

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 44 - 47

Résumé

Abstract

The aim of the study was to analyze the involvement of the endothelium in the effects of neutrophils (PMNL) on phenylephrine-pre-contracted isolated rings of the rat thoracic aorta and to compare their effects with those of peroxynitrite (ONOO) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Activated PMNL-induced contraction of the precontracted aorta was prevented by the blockade of NO-synthase and by endothelium removal. In the endothelium-free preparations, the effect of PMNL reappeared in the presence of sodium nitroprusside. The effect of ONOO and HOCl significantly differed from that of activated PMNL both in the presence and absence of the endothelium. It is therefore likely that neither ONOO nor HOCl generated by transformation of superoxide anion radical (O2•−) produced by PMNL is involved in their action. Reduction of the relaxant effect of nitric oxide derived from the endothelium by O2•− seems to be the keystone mechanism in generation of PMNL-induced contraction.

Mots clés

  • rat thoracic aorta
  • endothelium
  • nitric oxide
  • activated neutrophils
  • hypochlorous acid
  • peroxynitrite
Accès libre

Toxicological studies of aqueous extract of Acacia nilotica root

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 48 - 54

Résumé

Abstract

Acacia nilotica is a widely used plant in traditional medical practice in Northern Nigeria and many African countries. The aim of this study was to determine the toxicological effects of a single dose (acute) and of repeated doses (sub-acute) administration of aqueous extract of A. nilotica root in rodents, following our earlier study on antiplasmodial activity. In the acute toxicity test, three groups of Swiss albino mice were orally administered aqueous extract of A. nilotica (50, 300 and 2000 mg/kg body weight) and signs of toxicity were observed daily for 14 days. In the sub-acute toxicity study, four groups of 12 rats (6 male and 6 female) were used. Group 1 received 10 ml/kg b.w distilled water (control), while groups 2, 3 and 4 received 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w of the extract, respectively, for 28 consecutive days by oral gavage. Signs of toxicity/mortality, food and water intake and body weight changes were observed. Biochemical parameters were analysed in both plasma and liver homogenate. In the acute and sub-acute toxicity studies, the extract did not cause mortality. A significant reduction in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase was observed at 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w, while alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities were significantly higher than control values at 500 mg/kg b.w. The aqueous extract of A. nilotica was found to be safe in single dose administration in mice but repeated administration of doses higher than 250 mg/kg b.w of the extract for 28 days in rats may cause hepatotoxicity.

Mots clés

  • acute toxicity
  • sub-acute toxicity
8 Articles
Accès libre

Dose-dependent effect of N′-Nitrosodiethylamine on hepatic architecture, RBC rheology and polypeptide repertoire in Wistar rats

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 1 - 7

Résumé

Abstract

N′-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) is an effective hepatotoxicant, carcinogen and mutagen. NDEA-induced hepatic necrosis, through metabolic activation by CYP2E1, is an extensively used experimental model. In the present study, we analysed the dose- and time-dependent effect of NDEA on hepatic damage, RBC rheology and proteomic profile in male Wistar rats. The rats, 5–6 weeks old, were divided into four groups: Group-1 served as control and received normal saline, Group-2 received a single dose of 200 mg/kg body weight NDEA intraperitoneally (i.p.) and the animals were sacrificed after one week; the rats of Group-3 received a single dose of 100 mg/kg body weight NDEA and were sacrificed after one week; Group-4 received 100 mg/kg body weight/wk NDEA for two weeks and were then sacrificed. Various biochemical parameters such as ALT, AST, ALP and bilirubin were determined. Further, RBC rheology, histopathology (H&E staining) of liver biopsies and polypeptide profiling (SDS-PAGE) in sera and liver sections were also carried out both in control and NDEA treated groups. Our results showed a significant increase in all the biochemical parameters of the liver function test (p<0.05). In NDEA treated categories dacryocytes (tear drop cells), schistocytes (fragmented cells), codocytes (target cells), acanthocytes (spur cells) and ovalocytes (oval cells) were observed. H & E stained liver biopsies treated with NDEA showed abnormal liver architecture with severe haemorrhage, neutrophilic infiltration and dysplastic hepatocytes manifested in a dose-dependent manner. Software analysis of SDS-PAGE of control and NDEA treated rat sera and liver revealed qualitative and quantitative differences in polypeptide composition. Based on the presence/absence, polypeptides were classified in three different categories: (1) house-keeping, present in all the groups investigated; (2) novel, present in either control or NDEA treated group at any given time; (3) differential expression, showing quantitative differences. Our study indicates a dose and time-dependent hepatocellular damage and proteome profile which is likely due to NDEA-mediated oxidative stress in rats.

Mots clés

  • hepatotoxicity
  • -Nitrosodiethylamine
  • oxidative stress
  • polypeptide repertoire
  • RBC
  • SDS-PAGE
Accès libre

Antioxidant modulation of nevirapine induced hepatotoxicity in rats

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 8 - 14

Résumé

Abstract

HIV/AIDS related mortality has been dramatically reduced by the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, ART presents with associated adverse effects. One of such adverse effects is hepatotoxicity observed with nevirapine (NVP) containing ART. Since previous studies showed that NVP hepatotoxicity may be due to oxidative stress via generation of oxidative radicals, this study sought to evaluate the protective effects of antioxidants in alleviating NVP induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were divided into 6 groups with 8 animals per group and received doses of the antioxidants jobelyn (10.7 mg/kg/day), vitamin C (8 mg/kg/day), vitamin E (5 mg/kg/day) and/or NVP (6 mg/kg/day) for 60 days. The animals were sacrificed on day 61 by cervical dislocation, blood samples were collected for biochemical and hematological examination. The liver of the sacrificed animals was weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. There was a statistically significant (p<0.05) elevation in MDA level observed in the NVP group as compared with control. The results further showed non-significant decreases in the levels of MDA in the NVP plus antioxidant groups, except vitamin C, when compared with the NVP alone group. Vitamin E and Vitamin E plus C treated groups showed significantly (p<0.05) higher levels of SOD, CAT and GSH. The results also showed statistically significantly (p<0.05) lower levels of ALT and AST in the antioxidant treated groups There was an observed significantly (p<0.05) higher level of TP and urea in the antioxidant treated rats. A significantly (p<0.05) higher white blood cell count was observed in the antioxidant groups. Histopathological assessment of the liver extracted from the rats showed no visible pathology across the groups. Observations from this study suggest a potentially positive modulatory effect of antioxidants and may be indicative for the inclusion of antioxidants in nevirapine containing ART.

Mots clés

  • ART
  • nevirapine
  • jobelyn
  • vitamin C
  • vitamin E
Accès libre

Physiochemical basis of human degenerative disease

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 15 - 21

Résumé

Abstract

The onset of human degenerative diseases in humans, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, neurodevelopmental disease and neurodegenerative disease has been shown to be related to exposures to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and others, as well as to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, bisphenol-A and other aromatic lipophilic species. The onset of these diseases has also been related to exposures to transition metal ions. A physiochemical mechanism for the onset of degenerative environmental disease dependent upon exposure to a combination of lipophilic aromatic hydrocarbons and transition metal ions is proposed here. The findings reported here also, for the first time, explain why aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit greater toxicity than aliphatic hydrocarbons of equal carbon numbers.

Mots clés

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • cancer
  • degenerative environmental disease
  • diabetes
  • membrane permeability
  • toxicity mechanism
Accès libre

Effects of teicoplanin on cell number of cultured cell lines

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 22 - 24

Résumé

Abstract

Teicoplanin is a glycopeptide antibiotic with a wide variation in human serum half-life. It is also a valuable alternative of vancomycin. There is however no study on its effect on cultured cells. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of teicoplanin on cultured cell lines CHO, Jurkat E6.1 and MCF-7. The cultured cells were exposed to teicoplanin at final concentrations of 0–11000 μg/ml for 24 hours. To determine cell viability, the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test was performed. At low concentrations of teicoplanin the numbers of cultured cells (due to cell proliferation) were increased in the three cell lines examined. The maximum cell proliferation rates were observed at concentrations of 1000, 400, and 200 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. Cell toxicity was observed at final concentrations over 2000, 6000, and 400 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. A dose-dependent manner of cell toxicity was observed. Our present findings indicated that teicoplanin at clinically used concentrations induced cell proliferation. It should therefore be used cautiously, particularly in children, pregnant women and patients with cancer.

Mots clés

  • human cell lines
  • MTT
  • proliferation
  • teicoplanin
  • toxicology
Accès libre

Protective effect of Cupressus sempervirens extract against indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 25 - 34

Résumé

Abstract

Cupressus sempervirens (C. sempervirens) belongs to the family Cupressaceae. It is widspread in Northern Africa, Greece, Turkey, North America, Cyprus and Syria. Cupressuflavone is the major ingredient of the plant leave extract. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antiulcerogenic activity of the extract of C. sempervirens leaves in gastric ulcer tissues induced by indomethacin. The results of the present study revealed that indomethacin significantly decreased glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels, while it increased significantly lipid peroxidation (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and protein carbonyl (PC) levels in gastric tissue. Furthermore, indomethacin decreased p53 expression, while it increased bcl-2 expression in gastric tissue. Pretreatment with 5%, 10% & 20% of the LD50 of C. sempervirens and cupressuflavone of indomethacin-treated rats restored all the above parameters to approach normal values. C. sempervirens at the highest dose was more effective than the two lower doses. C. sempervirens proved more potent than cupressuflavone. In conclusion, C. sempervirens exerted antiulcerogenic activity and the effect was dose-dependent and related to the cupressuflavone ingredient of the plant leave extract.

Mots clés

  • gastric ulcer
  • Cupressuflavone
  • antioxidants
  • apoptosis
Accès libre

Probit analysis of comparative assays on toxicities of lead chloride and lead acetate to in vitro cultured human umbilical cord blood lymphocytes

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 35 - 43

Résumé

Abstract

This work describes that cytotoxicity of lead chloride and lead acetate to in vitro cultured lymphocytes from human umbilical cord blood, using four monitoring methods namely, trypan blue staining, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl] 2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and neutral red uptake assays; lead genotoxicity to lymphocytes was monitored by comet assay. The MIC value in each method was invariably 300 mg/L for PbCl2. Lethal concentration25 (LC25) values were almost in an agreeable range: 691.83 to 831.76 mg/L; LC50 values in each method were almost in the range: 1174.9 to 1348.9 mg/L; LC100 values were in the range: 3000 to 3300 mg/L, for lead chloride. Similarly, The MIC value in each method were invariably 150 mg/L; LC25 values were almost in the range: 295.12 to 371.53 mg/L; LC50 values were in the range: 501.18 to 588.84 mg/L; LC100 value was 1500 mg/L in all assays, for lead acetate. The comet assay also indicated that the LC100 values were 3300 mg/L lead chloride and 1500 mg/L lead acetate. Thus, both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were recorded at 3300 mg/L lead chloride and 1500 mg/L lead acetate with lymphocytes.

Mots clés

  • cytotoxicity
  • genotoxicity
  • lead chloride
  • lead acetate
  • AO/EB staining
  • MTT assay
  • comet assay
Accès libre

Endothelium and the effect of activated neutrophils on arterial smooth muscle

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 44 - 47

Résumé

Abstract

The aim of the study was to analyze the involvement of the endothelium in the effects of neutrophils (PMNL) on phenylephrine-pre-contracted isolated rings of the rat thoracic aorta and to compare their effects with those of peroxynitrite (ONOO) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Activated PMNL-induced contraction of the precontracted aorta was prevented by the blockade of NO-synthase and by endothelium removal. In the endothelium-free preparations, the effect of PMNL reappeared in the presence of sodium nitroprusside. The effect of ONOO and HOCl significantly differed from that of activated PMNL both in the presence and absence of the endothelium. It is therefore likely that neither ONOO nor HOCl generated by transformation of superoxide anion radical (O2•−) produced by PMNL is involved in their action. Reduction of the relaxant effect of nitric oxide derived from the endothelium by O2•− seems to be the keystone mechanism in generation of PMNL-induced contraction.

Mots clés

  • rat thoracic aorta
  • endothelium
  • nitric oxide
  • activated neutrophils
  • hypochlorous acid
  • peroxynitrite
Accès libre

Toxicological studies of aqueous extract of Acacia nilotica root

Publié en ligne: 10 Dec 2015
Pages: 48 - 54

Résumé

Abstract

Acacia nilotica is a widely used plant in traditional medical practice in Northern Nigeria and many African countries. The aim of this study was to determine the toxicological effects of a single dose (acute) and of repeated doses (sub-acute) administration of aqueous extract of A. nilotica root in rodents, following our earlier study on antiplasmodial activity. In the acute toxicity test, three groups of Swiss albino mice were orally administered aqueous extract of A. nilotica (50, 300 and 2000 mg/kg body weight) and signs of toxicity were observed daily for 14 days. In the sub-acute toxicity study, four groups of 12 rats (6 male and 6 female) were used. Group 1 received 10 ml/kg b.w distilled water (control), while groups 2, 3 and 4 received 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w of the extract, respectively, for 28 consecutive days by oral gavage. Signs of toxicity/mortality, food and water intake and body weight changes were observed. Biochemical parameters were analysed in both plasma and liver homogenate. In the acute and sub-acute toxicity studies, the extract did not cause mortality. A significant reduction in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase was observed at 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w, while alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities were significantly higher than control values at 500 mg/kg b.w. The aqueous extract of A. nilotica was found to be safe in single dose administration in mice but repeated administration of doses higher than 250 mg/kg b.w of the extract for 28 days in rats may cause hepatotoxicity.

Mots clés

  • acute toxicity
  • sub-acute toxicity

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