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Volume 2 (2022): Edition 1 (January 2022)

Volume 1 (2021): Edition 1 (January 2021)

Détails du magazine
Format
Magazine
eISSN
2720-1961
Première publication
01 Sep 2021
Période de publication
1 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

Chercher

Volume 2 (2022): Edition 1 (January 2022)

Détails du magazine
Format
Magazine
eISSN
2720-1961
Première publication
01 Sep 2021
Période de publication
1 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

Chercher

3 Articles
Accès libre

COVID-19 Pandemic: A Survey of Safety Practices among Eye Care Workers in Nigeria

Publié en ligne: 28 Jan 2022
Pages: 1 - 9

Résumé

Abstract

Objective: To assess safety practices among eye care workers in Nigeria during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Methods: This research was a cross-sectional study. A structured electronic questionnaire was distributed among eye care workers (ophthalmologists, optometrists, ophthalmic nurses) across the six geographical zones of Nigeria. Information on socio-demographics, COVID-19 infection, current working conditions and safety practices were obtained. Data analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc. Chicago Illinois, USA) for windows, version 22. Results: A total of 236 eye care workers participated in the study; their mean (±SD) age was 37.13 (±8.141) years, 125 (53%) were females, and 145 (61.4%) worked in a tertiary care hospital. All participants described COVID-19 as a viral disease and 98.3% agreed that the disease can affect the eyes. Outpatient clinic consultation was recorded as the highest (77.7%) service provided during the pandemic. Regarding preventive practices, 95% of eye care workers wore facemasks, 82.4% wore gloves during ophthalmic examination and Hazmat suit was the least used protective device (2.5%). About three-quarters (77.5%) reported feeling unsafe in their working environment and 63.9% were dissatisfied with the personal protective device provided by hospitals to eye care workers. Conclusion: COVID-19 pandemic presented an unprecedented challenge for eye care workers; with the practice of ophthalmology posing a high risk of transmission of the virus. Efforts should be made to provide the required personal protective devices needed for optimum protection of eye care workers in healthcare settings.

Mots clés

  • COVID-19
  • safety concerns
  • practices
  • eye care workers
  • Nigeria
Accès libre

Sickle cell Anaemia: The Need for Increased Drug Development in Africa

Publié en ligne: 07 Mar 2022
Pages: 10 - 15

Résumé

Abstract

Sickle cell anaemia is a life-threatening genetic disease that causes damage to red blood cells by polymerisation of deoxygenated haemoglobin. It is highly prevalent in Africa especially in regions with high prevalence of malaria. Over the years, hydroxyurea had been the only promising drug used in the management of sickle cell anaemia; however, it has been found to be unaffordable and not readily available to the affected poor people in rural areas. Several challenges face drug development efforts in Africa yet there remains a significant need for the development and standardisation of newer, cheaper, and effective anti-sickling drugs that would be readily affordable and available to meet the needs of the African populace.

Mots clés

  • Sickle
  • cell
  • disease
  • anaemia
  • drug
  • development
  • Africa
Accès libre

A Literature Review on the Global Burden and Impact of Substandard and Falsified Medicine

Publié en ligne: 22 Mar 2022
Pages: 16 - 31

Résumé

Abstract

Substandard and falsified medicines are a global health concern negatively affecting individuals, the public, the pharmaceutical industry and governments all over the world. This review aims to examine the global prevalence of substandard and falsified medicines, its impact on health and the health system, including socio-economic impacts and strategies for curbing this menace. A literature review of published articles between January 2000 and May 2020 was done with keywords “substandard”, “counterfeit”, and “falsified medicines”. Articles were sourced from PubMed, World Health Organization (WHO) databases and Google Scholar. There are reports of substandard and falsified medicines from all WHO Regions with noticeable prevalence in the African Region. These medicines have been reported to cause death, antimicrobial resistance, increase prevalence of diseases, and loss of confidence in the health system. Increased patients spending, loss of productivity, strain of limited health systems resources, and loss of government revenue are major socio-economic implications of substandard and falsified medicines. An increase in criminal sanctions, global harmonization of drug regulatory authorities, and appropriate education of healthcare professionals and patients on how to prevent, detect, and respond to reported cases of substandard and falsified medicines are strategies that can be implemented to curb the menace of these medicines. Registered pharmacists and pharmacy students play critical roles in addressing this global health issue.

Mots clés

  • Substandard
  • counterfeit
  • falsified medicines
  • strategies
3 Articles
Accès libre

COVID-19 Pandemic: A Survey of Safety Practices among Eye Care Workers in Nigeria

Publié en ligne: 28 Jan 2022
Pages: 1 - 9

Résumé

Abstract

Objective: To assess safety practices among eye care workers in Nigeria during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Methods: This research was a cross-sectional study. A structured electronic questionnaire was distributed among eye care workers (ophthalmologists, optometrists, ophthalmic nurses) across the six geographical zones of Nigeria. Information on socio-demographics, COVID-19 infection, current working conditions and safety practices were obtained. Data analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc. Chicago Illinois, USA) for windows, version 22. Results: A total of 236 eye care workers participated in the study; their mean (±SD) age was 37.13 (±8.141) years, 125 (53%) were females, and 145 (61.4%) worked in a tertiary care hospital. All participants described COVID-19 as a viral disease and 98.3% agreed that the disease can affect the eyes. Outpatient clinic consultation was recorded as the highest (77.7%) service provided during the pandemic. Regarding preventive practices, 95% of eye care workers wore facemasks, 82.4% wore gloves during ophthalmic examination and Hazmat suit was the least used protective device (2.5%). About three-quarters (77.5%) reported feeling unsafe in their working environment and 63.9% were dissatisfied with the personal protective device provided by hospitals to eye care workers. Conclusion: COVID-19 pandemic presented an unprecedented challenge for eye care workers; with the practice of ophthalmology posing a high risk of transmission of the virus. Efforts should be made to provide the required personal protective devices needed for optimum protection of eye care workers in healthcare settings.

Mots clés

  • COVID-19
  • safety concerns
  • practices
  • eye care workers
  • Nigeria
Accès libre

Sickle cell Anaemia: The Need for Increased Drug Development in Africa

Publié en ligne: 07 Mar 2022
Pages: 10 - 15

Résumé

Abstract

Sickle cell anaemia is a life-threatening genetic disease that causes damage to red blood cells by polymerisation of deoxygenated haemoglobin. It is highly prevalent in Africa especially in regions with high prevalence of malaria. Over the years, hydroxyurea had been the only promising drug used in the management of sickle cell anaemia; however, it has been found to be unaffordable and not readily available to the affected poor people in rural areas. Several challenges face drug development efforts in Africa yet there remains a significant need for the development and standardisation of newer, cheaper, and effective anti-sickling drugs that would be readily affordable and available to meet the needs of the African populace.

Mots clés

  • Sickle
  • cell
  • disease
  • anaemia
  • drug
  • development
  • Africa
Accès libre

A Literature Review on the Global Burden and Impact of Substandard and Falsified Medicine

Publié en ligne: 22 Mar 2022
Pages: 16 - 31

Résumé

Abstract

Substandard and falsified medicines are a global health concern negatively affecting individuals, the public, the pharmaceutical industry and governments all over the world. This review aims to examine the global prevalence of substandard and falsified medicines, its impact on health and the health system, including socio-economic impacts and strategies for curbing this menace. A literature review of published articles between January 2000 and May 2020 was done with keywords “substandard”, “counterfeit”, and “falsified medicines”. Articles were sourced from PubMed, World Health Organization (WHO) databases and Google Scholar. There are reports of substandard and falsified medicines from all WHO Regions with noticeable prevalence in the African Region. These medicines have been reported to cause death, antimicrobial resistance, increase prevalence of diseases, and loss of confidence in the health system. Increased patients spending, loss of productivity, strain of limited health systems resources, and loss of government revenue are major socio-economic implications of substandard and falsified medicines. An increase in criminal sanctions, global harmonization of drug regulatory authorities, and appropriate education of healthcare professionals and patients on how to prevent, detect, and respond to reported cases of substandard and falsified medicines are strategies that can be implemented to curb the menace of these medicines. Registered pharmacists and pharmacy students play critical roles in addressing this global health issue.

Mots clés

  • Substandard
  • counterfeit
  • falsified medicines
  • strategies

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