1. bookVolume 4 (2021): Edition 1 (June 2021)
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Effect of Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) on Some Physical and Bioactive Compounds of ‘Iceberg’ Lettuce (Lactuca Sativa L.)

Publié en ligne: 01 Jul 2021
Volume & Edition: Volume 4 (2021) - Edition 1 (June 2021)
Pages: 21 - 30
Reçu: 15 May 2021
Accepté: 26 May 2021
Détails du magazine
License
Format
Magazine
eISSN
2668-5124
Première parution
30 Sep 2019
Périodicité
2 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

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