1. bookVolume 9 (2020): Issue 2 (December 2020)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
08 Sep 2012
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Residents’ Willingness to Adopt Cycling as Intra-City Transport in Calabar, Nigeria

Published Online: 29 Jan 2021
Page range: 71 - 88
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
08 Sep 2012
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

This study investigated the willingness of residents to use bicycles for intra-city transportation in Calabar, South-South Nigeria. Administered questionnaires were successfully retrieved (82%) from residents of all income and employment groups in the 22 political wards of the study area. Stratified sampling technique was used to select survey participants. Initial socioeconomic characteristics of respondents in intercept only model was used to predict the willingness of respondents to ride in the city. Twelve problems of bicycle transportation were further presented to participants who rated them using a six-point scale (1-6), highly unwilling to highly willing to ride, respectively. Logistic Regression Analysis was employed to predict the probability that a respondent would be willing to ride. The predictor variables were respondents’ gender, age, education, occupational status, 12 bicycle infrastructure characteristics and dummy variables coding each socioeconomic scenario. A test of the full model versus a model with intercept only was statistically significant, χ2 (24, N = 315) = 50.5, p < .001 and χ2 (19, N = 315) = 36.5, p < .001. The model was able to correctly classify 86% of those willing to ride and 29.1% of those unwilling to ride, for an overall success rate of 66.2%. The study revealed that there is no gender sensitivity in the willingness of residents to ride in the city. In model 2, the odd ratio of some bicycle infrastructure characteristics such as bicycle lanes (1.181), conflicts with motorist (1.338), lack of respect for cycling (1.078), culture/stigma (1.046), weather (1.013), potholes (1.222), safety issues (1.280), and illumination (1.241) are more significant in predicting the probability of respondents to ride bicycles. The study recommended designated bicycle paths/trails to motivate residents to ride bicycles in the city.

Keywords

[1]. L. AULTMAN-HALL, F. L. HALL, B. B. BAETZ, B. B. Analysis of bicycle commuter routes using geographic information systems: implications for bicycle planning. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1578(1), 102-110, 1997.Search in Google Scholar

[2]. P. B. BALTES, J. SMITH. Multilevel and systemic analyses of old age: Theoretical and empirical evidence for a fourth age. Handbook of theories of aging, 153-173, 1999.Search in Google Scholar

[3]. J. P. BYRNES, D. C MILLER, W. D. SCHAFER. Gender differences in risk taking: a meta-analysis. Psychol. Bull. 125 (3), 367–383, 1999.Search in Google Scholar

[4]. J. de DIOS ORTUZAR, A. IACOBELLI, C. VALEZE. Estimating demand for a cycle-way network. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 34(5), 353-373, 2000.Search in Google Scholar

[5]. J. DILL, K. VOROS. Factors affecting bicycling demand: initial survey findings from the Portland, Oregon, region. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 2031(1), 9-17, 2007.Search in Google Scholar

[6]. L. B. DIXON. Bicycle and pedestrian level-of-service performance measures and standards for congestion management systems. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1538(1), 1-9, 1996.Search in Google Scholar

[7]. W. L. HASKELL, I. M. LEE, R. R. PATE, K. E. POWELL, S. N. BLAIR, B. A. FRANKLIN, A. BAUMAN. Physical activity and public health: updated recommendation for adults from the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association. Circulation, 116(9), 1081, 2007.Search in Google Scholar

[8]. K. C. HEESCH, S. SAHLQVIST, J. GARRARD. Gender differences in recreational and transport cycling: a cross-sectional mixed-methods comparison of cycling patterns, motivators, and constraints. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 9(1), 106, 2012.Search in Google Scholar

[9]. J. GARRARD, G. ROSE, S. K. LO. Promoting transportation cycling for women: The role of bicycle infrastructure. Journal of Preventive Medcine, 46(1), 55-59, 2008Search in Google Scholar

[10]. J. GARRARD, S. CRAWFORD, N. HAKMAN. Revolutions for women: increasing women's participation in cycling for recreation and transport, summary of key findings. Deakin University, Melbourne, 2006. Accessed on http://www.sport.vic.gov.au/web9/rwpgslib.nsf/GraphicFiles/1006-59RevolutionsKeyFindings/$file/1006-59RevolutionsKeyFindings.pdf. on 2 July 2007.Search in Google Scholar

[11]. J. I. GUYER. An African niche economy: Farming to feed Ibadan, 1968-88. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press for the International African Institute, London, 1997.Search in Google Scholar

[12]. M. E. JACKSON, E. O. RUEHR. Let the people be heard: San Diego County bicycle use and attitude survey. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1636(1), 8-12, 1998.Search in Google Scholar

[13]. K. KANG, K. LEE. Development of a bicycle level of service model from the user’s perspective. KSCE Journal of Civil Engineering, 16(6), 1032-1039, 2012.Search in Google Scholar

[14]. L. KANG, Y. XIONG, F. L. MANNERING. Statistical analysis of pedestrian perceptions of sidewalk level of service in the presence of bicycles. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 53(0), 10-21, 2013Search in Google Scholar

[15]. K. J. KRIZEK, P. J. JOHNSON. Proximity to trails and retail: effects on urban cycling and walking. Journal of the American Planning Association, 72(1), 33-42, 2006.Search in Google Scholar

[16]. T. LITMAN, D. BURWELL. Issues in sustainable transportation. International Journal of Global Environmental Issues, 6(4), 331-347, 2006.Search in Google Scholar

[17]. D. MOHAN, G. TIWARI. Sustainable transport systems: linkages between environmental issues, public transport, non-motorized transport and safety. Economic and Political Weekly, 1589-1596, 1999.Search in Google Scholar

[18]. A. V. MOUDON, C. LEE, A. D. CHEADLE, C. W. COLLIER, D. JOHNSON, T. L. SCHMID, R. D. WEATHER. Cycling and the built environment, a US perspective. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 10(3), 245-261, 2015.Search in Google Scholar

[19]. I. OKON, M. J. G. BRUSSEL, F. H. M van den BOSCH, C. A MORENO, M. F. A. M. van MAARSEVEEN, A statistical approach to the estimation of bicycle level of service models for the cicloruta in Bogota, Colombia. Urban Transport XXIII, 176, 265-282, 2017Search in Google Scholar

[20]. I. E. OKON, C. A. MORENO. Bicycle Level of Service Model for the Cycloruta, Bogota, Colombia. Romanian Journal of Transport Infrastructure, 8(1), 1-33, 2019.Search in Google Scholar

[21]. I. E. OKON, M. J. G. BRUSSEL M. J. G. Intersection level of service for the cycloruta bicycle infrastructure in Bogota, Colombia. Transport Policy (in the press, 2019)Search in Google Scholar

[22]. J. PUCHER, R. BUEHLER. Making cycling irresistible: lessons from the Netherlands, Denmark and Germany. Transport Reviews, 28(4), 495-528, 2008.Search in Google Scholar

[23]. C. RISSEL, D. MEROM, A. BAUMAN, J. GARRARD, L. M. WEN, C. NEW. Current cycling, bicycle path use, and willingness to cycle more-Findings from a community survey of cycling in southwest Sydney, Australia. Journal of physical activity & health, 7(2), 267, 2010.Search in Google Scholar

[24]. G. ROSE, H. MARFURT. Travel behaviour change impacts of a major ride to work day event. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 41(4), 351-364, 2007.Search in Google Scholar

[25]. A. SCHAFER, D. G. VICTOR. The future mobility of the world population. Transport Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 34 (3) 171-205, 2000Search in Google Scholar

[26]. K. SHAFIZADEH, D. NIEMEIER. Bicycle journey-to-work: travel behavior characteristics and spatial attributes. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1578(1), 84-90, 1997.Search in Google Scholar

[27]. D. SPERLING, D. GORDON. Two billion cars. Driving Toward Sustainability, 2009.Search in Google Scholar

[28]. L. STEINER. Group Process and Productivity (Social Psychological Monograph), 2007.Search in Google Scholar

[29]. N. STERN. The economics of climate change: The Stern review: Cambridge University Press, 2007.Search in Google Scholar

[30]. B. D. TAYLOR, H. MAHMASSANI. Analysis of stated preferences for intermodal bicycle-transit interfaces. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 1556(1), 86-95, 1996.Search in Google Scholar

[31]. V. F. WEI, G. LOVEGROVE. Sustainable road safety: A new (?) neighbourhood road pattern that saves VRU lives. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 44(1), 2012.Search in Google Scholar

Recommended articles from Trend MD

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo