1. bookVolume 26 (2019): Issue 4 (December 2019)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
01 May 2012
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Beneficial Effect of Pachyrhizus erosus Fiber as a Supplemental Diet to Counteract High Sugar-Induced Fatty Liver Disease in Mice

Published Online: 17 Feb 2020
Page range: 353 - 360
Received: 07 Aug 2019
Accepted: 14 Dec 2019
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
01 May 2012
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Background and aims: Edible fiber isolated from the tuber of yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus, Leguminosae) has been suggested to prevent the development of metabolic diseases caused by excessively consuming sugary foods. However, it is unclarified whether P. erosus fiber (PEF) is also capable of preventing liver diseases. This study aimed to determine the effectivity of PEF in counteracting the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) caused by excessive intake of high-sugar diet (HSD).

Keywords

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