1. bookVolume 48 (2018): Issue 1 (December 2018)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2083-4608
First Published
26 Feb 2008
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Methodology of stand tests on the selection of high energy materials for the construction of a tribogenerator

Published Online: 29 Mar 2019
Volume & Issue: Volume 48 (2018) - Issue 1 (December 2018)
Page range: 543 - 557
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2083-4608
First Published
26 Feb 2008
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The topic of developing a methodology and a stand test for the evaluation of materials intended for the construction of tribogenerators has been actualized in this article. The proposed method concerns the use of sliding friction in the course of which the mechanical energy is converted into electric energy using the triboelectric and electrostatic effect. The stand test scheme and research methodology are discussed. A preliminary study of friction pairs was carried out, proving the effectiveness of the methodology.

Keywords

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