1. bookVolume 14 (2014): Issue 3 (July 2014)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2300-8733
First Published
25 Nov 2011
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Open Access

Which Horses are Most Susceptible to the Initial Natural Training?

Published Online: 29 Jul 2014
Volume & Issue: Volume 14 (2014) - Issue 3 (July 2014)
Page range: 637 - 648
Received: 07 Aug 2013
Accepted: 20 Dec 2013
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2300-8733
First Published
25 Nov 2011
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The objective of the study was to estimate the horses’ susceptibility to the initial natural training by one mark regarding both the time of training and the heart rate, as well as to verify whether the time of internalizing a task and the heart rate are strictly correlated. the material included 69 thoroughbred, purebred arabian and angloarabian horses. three-day training consisted of consecutive stages-tasks: the concentration on the trainer, desensitizing, preparation for saddling, and saddling. The individual training times and heart rates were classified into three kinds of sections: low, intermediate, and high. the breeds were scored on a three-point scale according to the number of representatives in a section. pearson’s correlations for particular tasks were found between the data in the training time sections and the heart rate. the estimate resulting from the study demonstrates that thoroughbreds are the most susceptible to the natural training. purebred arabians rank second and angloarabians rank lowest. the angloarabians need more time to internalize the training tasks. the short time of internalizing a task by the horse is negatively correlated with the heart rate. however, in horses which need a longer time for the training, the hr is often heightened as well. that suggests the training time should be adjusted to the level of emotional arousal in a horse.

Keywords

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